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Chronic liver inflammation and hepatocellular carcinoma: persistence matters


Weber, A; Boege, Y; Reisinger, F; Heikenwalder, M (2011). Chronic liver inflammation and hepatocellular carcinoma: persistence matters. Swiss Medical Weekly, 141:w13197.

Abstract

Inflammatory responses in the liver--a central constituent of hepatic wound healing--can be self-limited or persistent depending on the aetiology, liver health state, concentration of toxins or pathogens, and the time frame of exposure to toxins or infection. In case the immune system eradicates a pathogen or in case toxin-exposure is transient, acute hepatitis resolves and the affected liver tissue regenerates ad integrum. However, in many cases liver damage remains chronic. Irrespective of the aetiology, chronic liver damage drives chronic hepatitis and hepatocyte death as well as compensatory proliferation, reflecting liver regeneration. Over time this potentially promotes further hepatic damage, fibrosis, cirrhosis and liver cancer. Here, we review the current knowledge on how chronic liver injury and inflammation is triggered and maintained, and how inflammation is linked to liver cancer. We also discuss the most frequently used animal models for damage or inflammation induced liver cancer and their suitability for conducting clinically relevant research.

Inflammatory responses in the liver--a central constituent of hepatic wound healing--can be self-limited or persistent depending on the aetiology, liver health state, concentration of toxins or pathogens, and the time frame of exposure to toxins or infection. In case the immune system eradicates a pathogen or in case toxin-exposure is transient, acute hepatitis resolves and the affected liver tissue regenerates ad integrum. However, in many cases liver damage remains chronic. Irrespective of the aetiology, chronic liver damage drives chronic hepatitis and hepatocyte death as well as compensatory proliferation, reflecting liver regeneration. Over time this potentially promotes further hepatic damage, fibrosis, cirrhosis and liver cancer. Here, we review the current knowledge on how chronic liver injury and inflammation is triggered and maintained, and how inflammation is linked to liver cancer. We also discuss the most frequently used animal models for damage or inflammation induced liver cancer and their suitability for conducting clinically relevant research.

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20 citations in Web of Science®
22 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Surgical Pathology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Neuropathology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:04 Aug 2011 08:45
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:58
Publisher:EMH Swiss Medical Publishers
ISSN:0036-7672
Publisher DOI:10.4414/smw.2011.13197
PubMed ID:21557112
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-48909

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