UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Prevalence of dog erythrocyte antigen 1.1 in dogs in Switzerland evaluated with the gel column technique


Riond, B; Schuler, E; Rogg, E; Hofmann-Lehmann, R; Lutz, H (2011). Prevalence of dog erythrocyte antigen 1.1 in dogs in Switzerland evaluated with the gel column technique. Schweizer Archiv für Tierheilkunde, 153(8):369-374.

Abstract

Canine blood typing has become an established and essential laboratory test due to the rising demand for safe and efficient blood transfusions. The most immunogenic and clinically important blood type is DEA 1.1. Little is known about DEA 1.1 frequencies or special characteristics among different canine breeds. 304 dogs were tested for DEA 1.1. DEA 1.1-typing was performed using a commercial gel column technique (ID-Gel Test Canine DEA 1.1, DiaMed, Cressier, Switzerland). Fifty-three percent of all tested dogs reacted positive for DEA 1.1, whereas 49 % of the mixed breeds tested DEA 1.1-positive. All Bernese mountain dogs (n = 22) and Rottweilers (n = 9) tested positive for DEA 1.1, while all Boxers (n = 8), Flat-Coated Retrievers (n = 9), and Border Collies (6) tested negative for DEA 1.1. The prevalence of DEA 1.1 in dogs in Switzerland was found to be comparable to that reported from other countries. The tested breeds were found to differ considerably in the frequency of DEA 1.1. This knowledge is useful for selection of blood donors. However, DEA 1.1 blood typing of donor and recipient prior to transfusion and cross matching in sensitized dogs is unavoidable.

Abstract

Canine blood typing has become an established and essential laboratory test due to the rising demand for safe and efficient blood transfusions. The most immunogenic and clinically important blood type is DEA 1.1. Little is known about DEA 1.1 frequencies or special characteristics among different canine breeds. 304 dogs were tested for DEA 1.1. DEA 1.1-typing was performed using a commercial gel column technique (ID-Gel Test Canine DEA 1.1, DiaMed, Cressier, Switzerland). Fifty-three percent of all tested dogs reacted positive for DEA 1.1, whereas 49 % of the mixed breeds tested DEA 1.1-positive. All Bernese mountain dogs (n = 22) and Rottweilers (n = 9) tested positive for DEA 1.1, while all Boxers (n = 8), Flat-Coated Retrievers (n = 9), and Border Collies (6) tested negative for DEA 1.1. The prevalence of DEA 1.1 in dogs in Switzerland was found to be comparable to that reported from other countries. The tested breeds were found to differ considerably in the frequency of DEA 1.1. This knowledge is useful for selection of blood donors. However, DEA 1.1 blood typing of donor and recipient prior to transfusion and cross matching in sensitized dogs is unavoidable.

Citations

3 citations in Web of Science®
3 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Farm Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:25 Aug 2011 06:45
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:59
Publisher:Hans Huber
ISSN:0036-7281
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1024/0036-7281/a000223
PubMed ID:21780065

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations