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Functional Genomics meets neurodegenerative disorders. Part II: application and data integration


Hoerndli, F; David, D C; Götz, J (2005). Functional Genomics meets neurodegenerative disorders. Part II: application and data integration. Progress in Neurobiology, 76(3):169-188.

Abstract

The transcriptomic and proteomic techniques presented in part I (Functional Genomics meets neurodegenerative disorders. Part I: transcriptomic and proteomic technology) of this back-to-back review have been applied to a range of neurodegenerative disorders, including Huntington's disease (HD), Prion diseases (PrD), Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer's disease (AD), frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Samples have been derived either from human brain and cerebrospinal fluid, tissue culture cells or brains and spinal cord of experimental animal models. With the availability of huge data sets it will firstly be a major challenge to extract meaningful information and secondly, not to obtain contradicting results when data are collected in parallel from the same source of biological specimen using different techniques. Reliability of the data highly depends on proper normalization and validation both of which are discussed together with an outlook on developments that can be anticipated in the future and are expected to fuel the field. The new insight undoubtedly will lead to a redefinition and subdivision of disease entities based on biochemical criteria rather than the clinical presentation. This will have important implications for treatment strategies.

Abstract

The transcriptomic and proteomic techniques presented in part I (Functional Genomics meets neurodegenerative disorders. Part I: transcriptomic and proteomic technology) of this back-to-back review have been applied to a range of neurodegenerative disorders, including Huntington's disease (HD), Prion diseases (PrD), Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer's disease (AD), frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Samples have been derived either from human brain and cerebrospinal fluid, tissue culture cells or brains and spinal cord of experimental animal models. With the availability of huge data sets it will firstly be a major challenge to extract meaningful information and secondly, not to obtain contradicting results when data are collected in parallel from the same source of biological specimen using different techniques. Reliability of the data highly depends on proper normalization and validation both of which are discussed together with an outlook on developments that can be anticipated in the future and are expected to fuel the field. The new insight undoubtedly will lead to a redefinition and subdivision of disease entities based on biochemical criteria rather than the clinical presentation. This will have important implications for treatment strategies.

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35 citations in Web of Science®
38 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute for Regenerative Medicine (IREM)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2005
Deposited On:05 Sep 2011 08:27
Last Modified:16 Aug 2016 10:14
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0301-0082
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pneurobio.2005.07.002
PubMed ID:16169146

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