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Assessing interactions in the brain with exact low-resolution electromagnetic tomography


Pascual-Marqui, R D; Lehmann, D; Koukkou, M; Kochi, K; Anderer, P; Saletu, B; Tanaka, H; Hirata, K; John, E R; Prichep, L; Biscay-Lirio, R; Kinoshita, T (2011). Assessing interactions in the brain with exact low-resolution electromagnetic tomography. Philosophical Transactions. Series A, Mathematical, Physical, and Engineering Sciences, 369(1952):3768-3784.

Abstract

Scalp electric potentials (electroencephalogram; EEG) are contingent to the impressed current density unleashed by cortical pyramidal neurons undergoing post-synaptic processes. EEG neuroimaging consists of estimating the cortical current density from scalp recordings. We report a solution to this inverse problem that attains exact localization: exact low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (eLORETA). This non-invasive method yields high time-resolution intracranial signals that can be used for assessing functional dynamic connectivity in the brain, quantified by coherence and phase synchronization. However, these measures are non-physiologically high because of volume conduction and low spatial resolution. We present a new method to solve this problem by decomposing them into instantaneous and lagged components, with the lagged part having almost pure physiological origin.

Scalp electric potentials (electroencephalogram; EEG) are contingent to the impressed current density unleashed by cortical pyramidal neurons undergoing post-synaptic processes. EEG neuroimaging consists of estimating the cortical current density from scalp recordings. We report a solution to this inverse problem that attains exact localization: exact low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (eLORETA). This non-invasive method yields high time-resolution intracranial signals that can be used for assessing functional dynamic connectivity in the brain, quantified by coherence and phase synchronization. However, these measures are non-physiologically high because of volume conduction and low spatial resolution. We present a new method to solve this problem by decomposing them into instantaneous and lagged components, with the lagged part having almost pure physiological origin.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Psychiatry, Psychotherapy, and Psychosomatics
04 Faculty of Medicine > The KEY Institute for Brain-Mind Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:15 Sep 2011 07:00
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:00
Publisher:Royal Society Publishing
ISSN:1364-503X
Publisher DOI:10.1098/rsta.2011.0081
Related URLs:http://rsta.royalsocietypublishing.org/ (Publisher)
PubMed ID:21893527
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-49631

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