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Is depression a risk factor for heart complaints? Longitudinal aspects in the Zurich study


Eich, D; Neuhaus, C; Gamma, A; Angst, J; Rossler, W; Ajdacic-Gross, V; Opravil, M (2007). Is depression a risk factor for heart complaints? Longitudinal aspects in the Zurich study. European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience, 257(7):396-401.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The objective of this longitudinal study was to assess the association between major depression and heart complaints in a population of young and healthy adults. METHODS: Starting at the age 20/21, participants of the Zurich Study underwent 6 structured, psychological interviews during a span of 20 years. We evaluated longitudinal data from 277 persons who participated in all 6 interviews including questions about heart complaints. RESULTS: Over 20 years, heart complaints were reported by two thirds of participants, and the frequency of depression was 11.4%. At the age of 40/ 41, heart complaints were significantly associated with earlier heart complaints and major depression, both more often in women. Recurrent brief depression showed a tendency, but neither minor depression nor depressive symptoms were predictive for later heart complaints. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that major depression is a predictor for heart complaints at the age of 40 and that the severity of depressive disorder in younger age has an effect on subsequent heart complaints. Follow-up data will help to elucidate whether these subjective heart complaints show any correlation with a later coronary heart disease.

BACKGROUND: The objective of this longitudinal study was to assess the association between major depression and heart complaints in a population of young and healthy adults. METHODS: Starting at the age 20/21, participants of the Zurich Study underwent 6 structured, psychological interviews during a span of 20 years. We evaluated longitudinal data from 277 persons who participated in all 6 interviews including questions about heart complaints. RESULTS: Over 20 years, heart complaints were reported by two thirds of participants, and the frequency of depression was 11.4%. At the age of 40/ 41, heart complaints were significantly associated with earlier heart complaints and major depression, both more often in women. Recurrent brief depression showed a tendency, but neither minor depression nor depressive symptoms were predictive for later heart complaints. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that major depression is a predictor for heart complaints at the age of 40 and that the severity of depressive disorder in younger age has an effect on subsequent heart complaints. Follow-up data will help to elucidate whether these subjective heart complaints show any correlation with a later coronary heart disease.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Psychiatry, Psychotherapy, and Psychosomatics
04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Clinical and Social Psychiatry Zurich West (former)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Depression/complications - Female - Heart Diseases/epidemiology/etiology - Humans - Interview, Psychological - Life Change Events - Longitudinal Studies - Male - Middle Aged - Questionnaires - Risk Factors - Switzerland/epidemiology
Language:English
Date:2007
Deposited On:28 Sep 2011 14:18
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:01
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0940-1334
Publisher DOI:10.1007/s00406-007-0747-x
PubMed ID:17902006

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