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Obsessive-compulsive disorder in children and adolescents


Walitza, S; Melfsen, S; Jans, T; Zellmann, H; Wewetzer, C; Warnke, A (2011). Obsessive-compulsive disorder in children and adolescents. Deutsches Ärzteblatt International, 108(11):173-179.

Abstract

OCD often begins in childhood or adolescence. There are empirically based neurobiological and cognitive-behavioral models of its pathophysiology. Multiaxial diagnostic evaluation permits early diagnosis. Behavioral therapy and medications are highly effective treatments, but the disorder nonetheless takes a chronic course in a large percentage of patients.

Abstract

OCD often begins in childhood or adolescence. There are empirically based neurobiological and cognitive-behavioral models of its pathophysiology. Multiaxial diagnostic evaluation permits early diagnosis. Behavioral therapy and medications are highly effective treatments, but the disorder nonetheless takes a chronic course in a large percentage of patients.

Citations

19 citations in Web of Science®
23 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:German
Date:2011
Deposited On:28 Sep 2011 12:57
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:01
Publisher:Deutscher Ärzte-Verlag
ISSN:1866-0452
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3238/arztebl.2011.0173
PubMed ID:21475565

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