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A rapid and reliable alternative to ISO 21528-1:2004 for detection of enterobacteriaceae


Joosten, H; Marugg, J; Stephan, R; Klijn, A; Jackson, T; Iversen, C (2008). A rapid and reliable alternative to ISO 21528-1:2004 for detection of enterobacteriaceae. International Journal of Food Microbiology, 125(3):344-346.

Abstract

Current legislation in Europe uses the Enterobacteriaceae as a parameter in process hygiene criteria for various food products and refers to the corresponding ISO standard (ISO 21528-1:2004) as mandatory analytical method for this purpose. The ISO procedure includes an enrichment step in EE (“Enterobacteriaceae Enrichment”) broth, but it has been reported recently that some isolates of Enterobacteriaceae do not grow well or will even die off in this broth, which could lead to false negative results.
To determine if this trait is common among the Enterobacteriaceae, a collection of 95 strains was screened for growth in EE broth. Inhibition was observed with 9 strains (7 Cronobacter sakazakii, 1 Cronobacter malonaticus and 1 Enterobacter amnigenus). Factors affecting cell death were found to be related mainly to the inclusion of bile salts and dyes in this medium. In a second step, an alternative method omitting the EE broth was evaluated using 326 samples, comprising 8 different food matrices and environmental samples from the corresponding manufacturing sites. Positive results were obtained for 235 samples using the ISO standard method and 232 samples using the alternative shortened method. No significant difference was found between the results for the two methods. It is proposed that the standard method for detection of Enterobacteriaceae is revised accordingly.

Current legislation in Europe uses the Enterobacteriaceae as a parameter in process hygiene criteria for various food products and refers to the corresponding ISO standard (ISO 21528-1:2004) as mandatory analytical method for this purpose. The ISO procedure includes an enrichment step in EE (“Enterobacteriaceae Enrichment”) broth, but it has been reported recently that some isolates of Enterobacteriaceae do not grow well or will even die off in this broth, which could lead to false negative results.
To determine if this trait is common among the Enterobacteriaceae, a collection of 95 strains was screened for growth in EE broth. Inhibition was observed with 9 strains (7 Cronobacter sakazakii, 1 Cronobacter malonaticus and 1 Enterobacter amnigenus). Factors affecting cell death were found to be related mainly to the inclusion of bile salts and dyes in this medium. In a second step, an alternative method omitting the EE broth was evaluated using 326 samples, comprising 8 different food matrices and environmental samples from the corresponding manufacturing sites. Positive results were obtained for 235 samples using the ISO standard method and 232 samples using the alternative shortened method. No significant difference was found between the results for the two methods. It is proposed that the standard method for detection of Enterobacteriaceae is revised accordingly.

Citations

14 citations in Web of Science®
13 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Food Safety and Hygiene
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:31 July 2008
Deposited On:03 Dec 2008 10:27
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:32
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0168-1605
Publisher DOI:10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2008.04.003
PubMed ID:18547668

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