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Shedding of food-borne pathogens and microbiological carcass contamination in rabbits at slaughter


Kohler, R; Krause, G; Beutin, L; Stephan, R; Zweifel, C (2008). Shedding of food-borne pathogens and microbiological carcass contamination in rabbits at slaughter. Veterinary Microbiology, 132(1-2):149-157.

Abstract

To obtain microbiological data from rabbits at slaughter, 500 fecal samples and 500 carcasses samples were examined. All samples tested negative for Listeria and Salmonella. Campylobacter were detected in two fecal samples. Of the 500 fecal samples, 45.8% tested positive for eae (intimin), 1.2% for stx (Shiga toxin), and 1.8% for both eae and stx. By colony hybridization, 56 eae positive Escherichia coli strains were isolated. Amongst them, 27 strains (48.2%) were of the serotypes O178:H7 and O153:H7, whereas 15 strains (26.8%) belonged to a serogroup that has not yet been described (O(CB10681):H7). All strains possessed intimin β1 and the translocated intimin receptor (tir) capable of being tyrosine phosphorylated. None of the strains harbored the genes for Shiga toxins, EAST1 (astA), bundlin (bfpA), or the EAF plasmid. Slaughter rabbits therefore constitute a reservoir for certain atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli. On rabbit carcasses, average total bacterial counts accounted for 3.3 log CFU cm-2. Enterobacteriaceae and coagulase positive staphylococci (CPS) were detected on 118 (23.6%) and 153 (30.6%) carcasses, respectively. Enterobacteriaceae and CPS counts of positive samples were mainly <1.5 log CFU cm-2. Among 153 selected CPS isolates, 98.7% were identified as Staphylococcus aureus. None of the 151 isolated strains harbored the gene for methicillin resistance (mecA). Genes for staphylococcal enterotoxins (SE) were detected in 102 strains. The combinations of seg and sei (53 strains) and sed, seg, sei, and sej (27 strains) dominated.

To obtain microbiological data from rabbits at slaughter, 500 fecal samples and 500 carcasses samples were examined. All samples tested negative for Listeria and Salmonella. Campylobacter were detected in two fecal samples. Of the 500 fecal samples, 45.8% tested positive for eae (intimin), 1.2% for stx (Shiga toxin), and 1.8% for both eae and stx. By colony hybridization, 56 eae positive Escherichia coli strains were isolated. Amongst them, 27 strains (48.2%) were of the serotypes O178:H7 and O153:H7, whereas 15 strains (26.8%) belonged to a serogroup that has not yet been described (O(CB10681):H7). All strains possessed intimin β1 and the translocated intimin receptor (tir) capable of being tyrosine phosphorylated. None of the strains harbored the genes for Shiga toxins, EAST1 (astA), bundlin (bfpA), or the EAF plasmid. Slaughter rabbits therefore constitute a reservoir for certain atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli. On rabbit carcasses, average total bacterial counts accounted for 3.3 log CFU cm-2. Enterobacteriaceae and coagulase positive staphylococci (CPS) were detected on 118 (23.6%) and 153 (30.6%) carcasses, respectively. Enterobacteriaceae and CPS counts of positive samples were mainly <1.5 log CFU cm-2. Among 153 selected CPS isolates, 98.7% were identified as Staphylococcus aureus. None of the 151 isolated strains harbored the gene for methicillin resistance (mecA). Genes for staphylococcal enterotoxins (SE) were detected in 102 strains. The combinations of seg and sei (53 strains) and sed, seg, sei, and sej (27 strains) dominated.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Food Safety and Hygiene
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:25 November 2008
Deposited On:25 Nov 2008 09:25
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:32
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0378-1135
Publisher DOI:10.1016/j.vetmic.2008.04.020
PubMed ID:18514438
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-4996

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