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Recognition of host proteins by Helicobacter cysteine-rich protein C


Roschitzki, B; Schauer, S; Mittl, P R E (2011). Recognition of host proteins by Helicobacter cysteine-rich protein C. Current Microbiology, 63(3):239-249.

Abstract

Tetratricopeptide- and sel1-like repeat (SLR) proteins modulate various cellular activities, ranging from transcription regulation to cell-fate control. Helicobacter cysteine-rich proteins (Hcp) consist of several SLRs that are cross-linked by disulfide bridges and have been implicated in host/pathogen interactions. Using pull-down proteomics, several human proteins including Nek9, Hsp90, and Hsc71 have been identified as putative human interaction partners for HcpC. The interaction between the NimA-like protein kinase Nek9 and HcpC has been validated by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance. Recombinant Nek9 is recognized by HcpC with a dissociation constant in the lower micromolar range. This interaction is formed either directly between Nek9 and HcpC or via the formation of a complex with Hsc71. The HcpC homologue HcpA possesses no affinity for Nek9, suggesting that the reported interaction is rather specific for HcpC. These results are consistent with previous observations where Nek9 was targeted upon bacterial or viral invasion. However, further experiments will be required to show that the reported interactions also occur in vivo.

Tetratricopeptide- and sel1-like repeat (SLR) proteins modulate various cellular activities, ranging from transcription regulation to cell-fate control. Helicobacter cysteine-rich proteins (Hcp) consist of several SLRs that are cross-linked by disulfide bridges and have been implicated in host/pathogen interactions. Using pull-down proteomics, several human proteins including Nek9, Hsp90, and Hsc71 have been identified as putative human interaction partners for HcpC. The interaction between the NimA-like protein kinase Nek9 and HcpC has been validated by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance. Recombinant Nek9 is recognized by HcpC with a dissociation constant in the lower micromolar range. This interaction is formed either directly between Nek9 and HcpC or via the formation of a complex with Hsc71. The HcpC homologue HcpA possesses no affinity for Nek9, suggesting that the reported interaction is rather specific for HcpC. These results are consistent with previous observations where Nek9 was targeted upon bacterial or viral invasion. However, further experiments will be required to show that the reported interactions also occur in vivo.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Biochemistry
07 Faculty of Science > Department of Biochemistry

04 Faculty of Medicine > Functional Genomics Center Zurich
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:12 Oct 2011 16:51
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:02
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0343-8651
Publisher DOI:10.1007/s00284-011-9969-2
PubMed ID:21735226
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-49998

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