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Erythropoietin


Wenger, R H; Kurtz, A (2011). Erythropoietin. Comprehensive Physiology, 1(4):1759-1794.

Abstract

The hormone erythropoietin (Epo) is the main humoral regulator of erythropoiesis. It binds to specific receptors belonging to the cytokine receptor superfamily. Epo stimulates proliferation and differentiation of erythroid precursor cells, but may also bind to and exert some additional effects in nonhemopoietic tissues. It is mainly produced in the kidneys and to minor extents also in the liver and in the brain. The plasma concentration of erthyropoietin is inversely related to the oxygen content of the blood. The secretion of Epo into the circulation and hence its plasma concentrations are mainly determined by the transcription rate of the Epo gene, which itself is essentially under control of the cellular oxygen concentration. Sinks of the oxygen concentrations increase the activity of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF), which in turn triggers Epo gene transcription. Disorders of kidney function lead to inappropriate Epo production, what may result in anemia or polycythemia.

The hormone erythropoietin (Epo) is the main humoral regulator of erythropoiesis. It binds to specific receptors belonging to the cytokine receptor superfamily. Epo stimulates proliferation and differentiation of erythroid precursor cells, but may also bind to and exert some additional effects in nonhemopoietic tissues. It is mainly produced in the kidneys and to minor extents also in the liver and in the brain. The plasma concentration of erthyropoietin is inversely related to the oxygen content of the blood. The secretion of Epo into the circulation and hence its plasma concentrations are mainly determined by the transcription rate of the Epo gene, which itself is essentially under control of the cellular oxygen concentration. Sinks of the oxygen concentrations increase the activity of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF), which in turn triggers Epo gene transcription. Disorders of kidney function lead to inappropriate Epo production, what may result in anemia or polycythemia.

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7 citations in Web of Science®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Physiology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Physiology

04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:October 2011
Deposited On:17 Oct 2011 15:28
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:02
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:2040-4603
Funders:Swiss National Foundation, National Center of Competence in Research Kidney.CH, COST Action TD0901 HypoxiaNet, German Research Foundation
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/cphy.c100075
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-50060

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