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The Doppler effect - an evolutionary critical cue for the perception of the direction of moving sound sources


Oechslin, M; Neukom, M; Bennet, G (2008). The Doppler effect - an evolutionary critical cue for the perception of the direction of moving sound sources. In: IEEE. Proceedings of the International Conference on Audio, Language and Image Processing. ICALIP 2008. Shanghai: IEEE, 676-679.

Abstract

Objects that are about to confront us are crucial for prospective actions. Even if we are not able to see what is approaching, the processing of auditory information enables us to identify the direction of moving sound sources. Various mechanisms allow us to accomplish this task most effectively. To date all of the mechanisms that have been widely discussed are based on sound-level differences or on timing aspects of incoming sounds. We considered sound sources which move radially towards or away from the listener emitting signals with constant amplitudes. If objects are too far away from us to produce any perceivable level differences, we have to rely on other acoustic cues. In an experiment using synthesized sounds in a virtual environment, we show that the so-called Doppler effect, which shifts the frequency of the direct sound and its reflections, is sufficient to identify correctly whether a moving sound source approaches or recedes.

Objects that are about to confront us are crucial for prospective actions. Even if we are not able to see what is approaching, the processing of auditory information enables us to identify the direction of moving sound sources. Various mechanisms allow us to accomplish this task most effectively. To date all of the mechanisms that have been widely discussed are based on sound-level differences or on timing aspects of incoming sounds. We considered sound sources which move radially towards or away from the listener emitting signals with constant amplitudes. If objects are too far away from us to produce any perceivable level differences, we have to rely on other acoustic cues. In an experiment using synthesized sounds in a virtual environment, we show that the so-called Doppler effect, which shifts the frequency of the direct sound and its reflections, is sufficient to identify correctly whether a moving sound source approaches or recedes.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:05 Dec 2008 09:41
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:32
Publisher:IEEE
ISBN:978-1-4244-1723-0
Additional Information:International Conference on Audio, Language and Image Processing (ICALIP), Shanghai, China, 7-9 July 2008. The conference proceedings with including all the accepted papers will be published by IEEE (IEEE Catalog Number: CFP0850D). © 2008 IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. However, permission to reprint/republish this material for advertising or promotional purposes or for creating new collective works for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or to reuse any copyrighted component of this work in other works must be obtained from the IEEE.
Publisher DOI:10.1109/ICALIP.2008.4590253
Official URL:http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpls/abs_all.jsp?arnumber=4590253
Related URLs:http://www.icalip2008.cn/
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-5008

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