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Posttraumatic stress and behavior problems in infants and toddlers with burns


Graf, A; Schiestl, C; Landolt, M A (2011). Posttraumatic stress and behavior problems in infants and toddlers with burns. Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 36(8):923-931.

Abstract

This study assessed posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and behavior problems in young children with burns and examined individual, injury-related, and family-related determinants. Seventy-six children, aged 12-49 months, were assessed at an average of 15 months after their burn injury, using parents as informants on the posttraumatic stress disorder semi-structured interview and observational record for infants and young children and the child behavior checklist. Ten children (13.2%) met the alternative criteria for PTSD proposed by Scheeringa et al. Number of PTSD symptoms were associated with family-related variables (maternal PTSD, quality of family relations). Compared to community norms, children with burns showed less externalizing behavior problems, and internalizing behavior problems were within the normal range. Overall, behavioral adjustment was associated with the quality of family relations (cohesion, expressiveness, conflicts). Whereas behavior was found to be normal in young children with burns, this study provides evidence for a substantial prevalence of PTSD.

Abstract

This study assessed posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and behavior problems in young children with burns and examined individual, injury-related, and family-related determinants. Seventy-six children, aged 12-49 months, were assessed at an average of 15 months after their burn injury, using parents as informants on the posttraumatic stress disorder semi-structured interview and observational record for infants and young children and the child behavior checklist. Ten children (13.2%) met the alternative criteria for PTSD proposed by Scheeringa et al. Number of PTSD symptoms were associated with family-related variables (maternal PTSD, quality of family relations). Compared to community norms, children with burns showed less externalizing behavior problems, and internalizing behavior problems were within the normal range. Overall, behavioral adjustment was associated with the quality of family relations (cohesion, expressiveness, conflicts). Whereas behavior was found to be normal in young children with burns, this study provides evidence for a substantial prevalence of PTSD.

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15 citations in Web of Science®
15 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:September 2011
Deposited On:24 Oct 2011 11:58
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:03
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0146-8693
Additional Information:This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in Journal of Pediatric Psychology following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version "Graf, A; Schiestl, C; Landolt , M A (2011). Posttraumatic stress and behavior problems in infants and toddlers with burns. Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 36(8):923-931" is available online at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jpepsy/jsr021
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/jpepsy/jsr021
PubMed ID:21515642

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