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Neonatal morbidity in singleton late preterm infants compared with full-term infants


Leone, A; Ersfeld, P; Adams, M; Meyer Schiffer, P; Bucher, H U; Arlettaz, R (2012). Neonatal morbidity in singleton late preterm infants compared with full-term infants. Acta Paediatrica, 101(1):e6-e10.

Abstract

Aim:  The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that singleton late preterm infants (34 0/7 to 36 6/7 weeks of gestation) compared with full-term infants have a higher incidence of short-term morbidity and stay longer in hospital. Methods:  In this retrospective, multicentre study, electronic data of children born at five hospitals in Switzerland were recorded. Short-term outcome of late preterm infants was compared with a control group of full-term infants (39 0/7 to 40 6/7 weeks of gestation). Multiple gestations, pregnancies complicated by foetal malformations, maternal consumption of illicit drugs and infants with incomplete documentation were excluded. The results were corrected for gender imbalance. Results:  Data from 530 late preterm and 1686 full-term infants were analysed. Compared with full-term infants, late preterm infants had a significant higher morbidity: respiratory distress (34.7% vs. 4.6%), hyperbilirubinaemia (47.7% vs. 3.4%), hypoglycaemia (14.3% vs. 0.6%), hypothermia (2.5% vs. 0.6%) and duration of hospitalization (mean, 9.9 days vs. 5.2 days). The risk to develop at least one complication was 7.6 (95% CI: 6.2-9.6) times higher among late preterm infants (70.8%) than among full-term infants (9.3%). Conclusion:  Singleton late preterm infants show considerably higher rate of medical complications and prolonged hospital stay compared with matched full-term infants and therefore need more medical and financial resources.

Abstract

Aim:  The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that singleton late preterm infants (34 0/7 to 36 6/7 weeks of gestation) compared with full-term infants have a higher incidence of short-term morbidity and stay longer in hospital. Methods:  In this retrospective, multicentre study, electronic data of children born at five hospitals in Switzerland were recorded. Short-term outcome of late preterm infants was compared with a control group of full-term infants (39 0/7 to 40 6/7 weeks of gestation). Multiple gestations, pregnancies complicated by foetal malformations, maternal consumption of illicit drugs and infants with incomplete documentation were excluded. The results were corrected for gender imbalance. Results:  Data from 530 late preterm and 1686 full-term infants were analysed. Compared with full-term infants, late preterm infants had a significant higher morbidity: respiratory distress (34.7% vs. 4.6%), hyperbilirubinaemia (47.7% vs. 3.4%), hypoglycaemia (14.3% vs. 0.6%), hypothermia (2.5% vs. 0.6%) and duration of hospitalization (mean, 9.9 days vs. 5.2 days). The risk to develop at least one complication was 7.6 (95% CI: 6.2-9.6) times higher among late preterm infants (70.8%) than among full-term infants (9.3%). Conclusion:  Singleton late preterm infants show considerably higher rate of medical complications and prolonged hospital stay compared with matched full-term infants and therefore need more medical and financial resources.

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22 citations in Web of Science®
30 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neonatology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:27 Oct 2011 14:14
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:03
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0803-5253
Additional Information:The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1651-2227.2011.02459.x
PubMed ID:21895764

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