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Iron core/shell nanoparticles as magnetic drug carriers: possible interactions with the vascular compartment


Herrmann, I K; Urner, M; Hasler, M; Roth-Z'Graggen, B; Aemisegger, C; Baulig, W; Athanassiou, E K; Regenass, S; Stark, W J; Beck-Schimmer, B (2011). Iron core/shell nanoparticles as magnetic drug carriers: possible interactions with the vascular compartment. Nanomedicine, 6(7):1199-1213.

Abstract

These findings provide the fundament to initiate successful first in vivo evaluations opening metal nanomagnets with improved magnetic properties to fascinating applications in nanomedicine.

These findings provide the fundament to initiate successful first in vivo evaluations opening metal nanomagnets with improved magnetic properties to fascinating applications in nanomedicine.

Citations

12 citations in Web of Science®
13 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Immunology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Physiology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Physiology

04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Anesthesiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:10 Nov 2011 14:07
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:04
Publisher:Future Medicine
ISSN:1743-5889
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.2217/nnm.11.33
PubMed ID:21726135

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