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Permanent URL to this publication: http://dx.doi.org/10.5167/uzh-50775

Kast, M; Baschera, G M; Gross, M; Jäncke, Lutz; Meyer, Martin (2011). Computer-based learning of spelling skills in children with and without dyslexia. Annals of Dyslexia, 61(2):177-200.

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Abstract

Our spelling training software recodes words into multisensory representations comprising visual and auditory codes. These codes represent information about letters and syllables of a word. An enhanced version, developed for this study, contains an additional phonological code and an improved word selection controller relying on a phoneme-based student model. We investigated the spelling behavior of children by means of learning curves based on log-file data of the previous and the enhanced software version. First, we compared the learning progress of children with dyslexia working either with the previous software (n = 28) or the adapted version (n = 37). Second, we investigated the spelling behavior of children with dyslexia (n = 37) and matched children without dyslexia (n = 25). To gain deeper insight into which factors are relevant for acquiring spelling skills, we analyzed the influence of cognitive abilities, such as attention functions and verbal memory skills, on the learning behavior. All investigations of the learning process are based on learning curve analyses of the collected log-file data. The results evidenced that those children with dyslexia benefit significantly from the additional phonological cue and the corresponding phoneme-based student model. Actually, children with dyslexia improve their spelling skills to the same extent as children without dyslexia and were able to memorize phoneme to grapheme correspondence when given the correct support and adequate training. In addition, children with low attention functions benefit from the structured learning environment. Generally, our data showed that memory sources are supportive cognitive functions for acquiring spelling skills and for using the information cues of a multi-modal learning environment.

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
DDC:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:08 Nov 2011 13:42
Last Modified:29 Nov 2013 21:07
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0736-9387
Publisher DOI:10.1007/s11881-011-0052-2
Citations:Web of Science®. Times Cited: 1
Google Scholar™
Scopus®. Citation Count: 1

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