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Use of insulin glargine in dogs with diabetes mellitus


Fracassi, F; Boretti, F S; Sieber-Ruckstuhl, N S; Reusch, C E (2012). Use of insulin glargine in dogs with diabetes mellitus. Veterinary Record, 170(2):52.

Abstract

The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of insulin glargine in dogs with diabetes mellitus (DM). Twelve client-owned dogs with DM were included. All dogs received insulin glargine every 12 hours for at least six months, re-evaluations were performed after one, two, four, eight, 12 and 24 weeks and included clinical signs, blood glucose curves (BGCs) and measurement of serum fructosamine concentrations. Mean blood glucose concentrations were significantly lower after two weeks of treatment and remained significantly lower for the duration of the study. By week 24, polyuria/polydipsia had improved in 91 per cent of the dogs. No clinical signs that could have been caused by hypoglycaemia were observed. Based on BGCs and remission of the clinical signs for judging the success of the treatment, 58, 33 and 8 per cent of the dogs attained good, moderate and poor glycaemic control by week 24 of the study, respectively. Insulin glargine administered subcutaneously twice daily is a possible and safe method of treatment for dogs with naturally occurring DM. Although only a few studies are available on the use of other types of insulin in dogs, their success rate is somewhat greater than that with insulin glargine.

The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of insulin glargine in dogs with diabetes mellitus (DM). Twelve client-owned dogs with DM were included. All dogs received insulin glargine every 12 hours for at least six months, re-evaluations were performed after one, two, four, eight, 12 and 24 weeks and included clinical signs, blood glucose curves (BGCs) and measurement of serum fructosamine concentrations. Mean blood glucose concentrations were significantly lower after two weeks of treatment and remained significantly lower for the duration of the study. By week 24, polyuria/polydipsia had improved in 91 per cent of the dogs. No clinical signs that could have been caused by hypoglycaemia were observed. Based on BGCs and remission of the clinical signs for judging the success of the treatment, 58, 33 and 8 per cent of the dogs attained good, moderate and poor glycaemic control by week 24 of the study, respectively. Insulin glargine administered subcutaneously twice daily is a possible and safe method of treatment for dogs with naturally occurring DM. Although only a few studies are available on the use of other types of insulin in dogs, their success rate is somewhat greater than that with insulin glargine.

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5 citations in Web of Science®
8 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:10 Nov 2011 16:12
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:05
Publisher:British Veterinary Association
ISSN:0042-4900
Publisher DOI:10.1136/vr.100070
PubMed ID:22008227

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