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Sodium oxybate in narcolepsy with cataplexy: Zurich sleep center experience


Poryazova, R; Tartarotti, S; Khatami, R; Baumann, C R; Valko, P; Kallweit, U; Werth, E; Bassetti, C L (2011). Sodium oxybate in narcolepsy with cataplexy: Zurich sleep center experience. European Neurology, 65(3):175-182.

Abstract

Sodium oxybate (SO; Xyrem®) has been approved in most countries for treatment of narcolepsy and cataplexy. In this study, we present a single-center experience of a series of 18 patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy (18/18 DQB1*0602 positive, 17/17 with low/absent cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin) in whom SO was prescribed. After 26 ± 13 months, 13/18 patients were still on SO at a mean dosage of 6.1 ± 1.2 g (in 8 of them in combination with stimulants). The following significant effects were observed: improved subjective sleepiness (12/13), cataplexy (13/13; median number of attacks from 20 to 1/month), hallucinations (8/10) and sleep paralysis (8/8); increase in mean sleep latency on the Maintenance of Wakefulness Test (from 5.5 to 17.4 min) and sleep/rest efficiency on actigraphy (from 61 to 76%); decrease in Epworth Sleepiness Scale score (from 18 to 14), sleep onset REM periods on the Multiple Sleep Latency Test (from 3.6 to 2.4) and errors in the Steer-Clear Test (from 11 to 2%). Five patients discontinued SO because of insufficient compliance (n = 2), lack of efficiency (n = 1) and side effects (n = 1). These data confirm and expand previous reports on the good effects and tolerability of SO as a treatment for narcolepsy with cataplexy.

Sodium oxybate (SO; Xyrem®) has been approved in most countries for treatment of narcolepsy and cataplexy. In this study, we present a single-center experience of a series of 18 patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy (18/18 DQB1*0602 positive, 17/17 with low/absent cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin) in whom SO was prescribed. After 26 ± 13 months, 13/18 patients were still on SO at a mean dosage of 6.1 ± 1.2 g (in 8 of them in combination with stimulants). The following significant effects were observed: improved subjective sleepiness (12/13), cataplexy (13/13; median number of attacks from 20 to 1/month), hallucinations (8/10) and sleep paralysis (8/8); increase in mean sleep latency on the Maintenance of Wakefulness Test (from 5.5 to 17.4 min) and sleep/rest efficiency on actigraphy (from 61 to 76%); decrease in Epworth Sleepiness Scale score (from 18 to 14), sleep onset REM periods on the Multiple Sleep Latency Test (from 3.6 to 2.4) and errors in the Steer-Clear Test (from 11 to 2%). Five patients discontinued SO because of insufficient compliance (n = 2), lack of efficiency (n = 1) and side effects (n = 1). These data confirm and expand previous reports on the good effects and tolerability of SO as a treatment for narcolepsy with cataplexy.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:07 Jan 2012 18:15
Last Modified:30 Jun 2016 14:45
Publisher:Karger
ISSN:0014-3022
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1159/000324549
PubMed ID:21389728
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-50908

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