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Chronic stroke survivors benefit from high-intensity aerobic treadmill exercise: A randomized controlled trial


Globas, C; Becker, C; Cerny, J; Lam, J M; Lindemann, U; Forrester, L W; Macko, R F; Luft, A R (2012). Chronic stroke survivors benefit from high-intensity aerobic treadmill exercise: A randomized controlled trial. Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, 26(1):85-95.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: and objective. Ambulatory subjects after stroke may benefit from gait-oriented cardiovascular fitness training, but trials to date have not primarily assessed older persons. METHODS: . Thirty-eight subjects (age >60 years) with residual hemiparetic gait were enrolled >6 months after stroke. Participants were randomized to receive 3 months (3×/week) progressive graded, high-intensity aerobic treadmill exercise (TAEX) or conventional care physiotherapy. Primary outcome measures were peak exercise capacity (Vo(2peak)) and sustained walking capacity in 6-minute walks (6MW). Secondary measures were gait velocity in 10-m walks, Berg Balance Scale, functional leg strength (5 chair-rise), self-rated mobility (Rivermead Mobility Index), and quality of life (SF-12). RESULTS: . Thirty-six participants completed the study (18 TAEX, 18 controls). TAEX but not conventional care improved Vo(2peak) (difference 6.4 mL/kg/min, P < .001) and 6MW (53 m, P < .001). Likewise, maximum walking speed (0.13 m/s, P = .01), balance (P < .05), and the mental subscore of the SF-12 (P < .01) improved more after TAEX. Gains in Vo(2peak) correlated with the degree at which training intensity could be progressed in the individual participant (P < .01). Better walking was related to progression in treadmill velocity and training duration (P < .001). Vo(2peak) and 6MW performances were still higher 1 year after the end of training when compared with the baseline, although endurance walking (6MW) at 1 year was lower than immediately after training (P < .01). CONCLUSION: . This trial demonstrates that TAEX effectively improves cardiovascular fitness and gait in persons with chronic stroke.

BACKGROUND: and objective. Ambulatory subjects after stroke may benefit from gait-oriented cardiovascular fitness training, but trials to date have not primarily assessed older persons. METHODS: . Thirty-eight subjects (age >60 years) with residual hemiparetic gait were enrolled >6 months after stroke. Participants were randomized to receive 3 months (3×/week) progressive graded, high-intensity aerobic treadmill exercise (TAEX) or conventional care physiotherapy. Primary outcome measures were peak exercise capacity (Vo(2peak)) and sustained walking capacity in 6-minute walks (6MW). Secondary measures were gait velocity in 10-m walks, Berg Balance Scale, functional leg strength (5 chair-rise), self-rated mobility (Rivermead Mobility Index), and quality of life (SF-12). RESULTS: . Thirty-six participants completed the study (18 TAEX, 18 controls). TAEX but not conventional care improved Vo(2peak) (difference 6.4 mL/kg/min, P < .001) and 6MW (53 m, P < .001). Likewise, maximum walking speed (0.13 m/s, P = .01), balance (P < .05), and the mental subscore of the SF-12 (P < .01) improved more after TAEX. Gains in Vo(2peak) correlated with the degree at which training intensity could be progressed in the individual participant (P < .01). Better walking was related to progression in treadmill velocity and training duration (P < .001). Vo(2peak) and 6MW performances were still higher 1 year after the end of training when compared with the baseline, although endurance walking (6MW) at 1 year was lower than immediately after training (P < .01). CONCLUSION: . This trial demonstrates that TAEX effectively improves cardiovascular fitness and gait in persons with chronic stroke.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:15 Nov 2011 11:55
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:06
Publisher:Sage Publications
ISSN:1545-9683
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1177/1545968311418675
PubMed ID:21885867
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-51003

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