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Lactate minimum is valid to estimate maximal lactate steady state in moderately and highly trained subjects


Knoepfli-Lenzin, C; Boutellier, U (2011). Lactate minimum is valid to estimate maximal lactate steady state in moderately and highly trained subjects. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 25(5):1355-1359.

Abstract

Some evidence exists that the determination of maximal lactate steady state (MLSS) with lactate minimum (LM) in highly trained athletes is not as accurate as in less trained athletes. Therefore, we compared power output at LM with power output MLSS in moderately up to highly trained subjects. 63 subjects performed a test on a cycle ergometer to determine power output at LM and 3 or more constant-load tests of 30 minutes to determine power output at MLSS. Mean power output at LM (245 ± 29 W; mean ± SD) was slightly lower than power output at MLSS (255 ± 32 W). The correlation between power output at MLSS and LM was high, and the regression line runs parallel to the line of identity showing that the results of highly trained subjects agree with the results of less trained subjects (LM and MLSS r = 0.867, p < 0.001). The modified blood-lactate kinetic in highly trained athletes compared with less trained persons does not impair accuracy at LM. Therefore, we suggest LM as a valid and meaningful concept to estimate power output at MLSS in 1 single test in moderately up to highly trained athletes.

Some evidence exists that the determination of maximal lactate steady state (MLSS) with lactate minimum (LM) in highly trained athletes is not as accurate as in less trained athletes. Therefore, we compared power output at LM with power output MLSS in moderately up to highly trained subjects. 63 subjects performed a test on a cycle ergometer to determine power output at LM and 3 or more constant-load tests of 30 minutes to determine power output at MLSS. Mean power output at LM (245 ± 29 W; mean ± SD) was slightly lower than power output at MLSS (255 ± 32 W). The correlation between power output at MLSS and LM was high, and the regression line runs parallel to the line of identity showing that the results of highly trained subjects agree with the results of less trained subjects (LM and MLSS r = 0.867, p < 0.001). The modified blood-lactate kinetic in highly trained athletes compared with less trained persons does not impair accuracy at LM. Therefore, we suggest LM as a valid and meaningful concept to estimate power output at MLSS in 1 single test in moderately up to highly trained athletes.

Citations

6 citations in Web of Science®
9 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Physiology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Physiology

04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:May 2011
Deposited On:18 Nov 2011 09:38
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:06
Publisher:Lippincott Wiliams & Wilkins
ISSN:1064-8011
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0b013e3181d6dbf4
PubMed ID:21522075

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