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Empirical test of the spectral invariants theory using imaging spectroscopy data from a coniferous forest


Lukeš, P; Rautiainen, M; Stenberg, P; Malenovský, Z (2011). Empirical test of the spectral invariants theory using imaging spectroscopy data from a coniferous forest. International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation, 13(4):668-675.

Abstract

The spectral invariants theory presents an alternative approach for modeling canopy scattering in remote sensing applications. The theory is particularly appealing in the case of coniferous forests, which typically display grouped structures and require computationally intensive calculation to account for the geometric arrangement of their canopies. However, the validity of the spectral invariants theory should be tested with empirical data sets from different vegetation types. In this paper, we evaluate a method to retrieve two canopy spectral invariants, the recollision probability and the escape factor, for a coniferous forest using imaging spectroscopy data from multiangular CHRIS PROBA and NADIR- view AISA Eagle sensors. Our results indicated that in coniferous canopies the spectral invariants theory performs well in the near infrared spectral range. In the visible range, on the other hand, the spectral invariants theory may not be useful. Secondly, our study suggested that retrieval of the escape factor could be used as a new method to describe the BRDF of a canopy.

Abstract

The spectral invariants theory presents an alternative approach for modeling canopy scattering in remote sensing applications. The theory is particularly appealing in the case of coniferous forests, which typically display grouped structures and require computationally intensive calculation to account for the geometric arrangement of their canopies. However, the validity of the spectral invariants theory should be tested with empirical data sets from different vegetation types. In this paper, we evaluate a method to retrieve two canopy spectral invariants, the recollision probability and the escape factor, for a coniferous forest using imaging spectroscopy data from multiangular CHRIS PROBA and NADIR- view AISA Eagle sensors. Our results indicated that in coniferous canopies the spectral invariants theory performs well in the near infrared spectral range. In the visible range, on the other hand, the spectral invariants theory may not be useful. Secondly, our study suggested that retrieval of the escape factor could be used as a new method to describe the BRDF of a canopy.

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5 citations in Web of Science®
6 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:25 Nov 2011 10:03
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:07
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1569-8432
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jag.2011.04.003

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