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Einstellungen zum eigenen Altern: Eine Alters- oder eine Ressourcenfrage?


Schelling, Hans Rudolf; Martin, Mike (2008). Einstellungen zum eigenen Altern: Eine Alters- oder eine Ressourcenfrage? Zeitschrift für Gerontologie und Geriatrie, 41(1):38-50.

Abstract

Recent studies have demonstrated that positive and negative stereotypes and attitudes toward age and aging may have substantial effects on the longterm development of cognitive and physical performance in old age. Relatively little is known to which degree attitudes toward one's own aging depend on (a) the current level of individual resources, (b) changes in the level of individual resources, or (c) the increasing age of older persons. The present study examined the relations between individual physical, mental, and cognitive resources and the attitudes toward one's own aging. The study was conducted with N=500 participants of the Interdisciplinary Longitudinal Study of Adult Development (ILSE) born between 1930 and 1932 (age: M=63.0, SD=0.9 at T1 and M=66.9, SD=0.9 at T2). The results indicate that the attitudes toward one's own aging (a) become more negative with increasing age, (b) most strongly depend on the available resources, (c) changes in level of resources contribute to the prediction of the attitudes toward one's own aging, and (d) age acts more as a reinforcing factor on the relation between resources and attitudes than as an independent factor on the attitudes toward one's own aging.

Recent studies have demonstrated that positive and negative stereotypes and attitudes toward age and aging may have substantial effects on the longterm development of cognitive and physical performance in old age. Relatively little is known to which degree attitudes toward one's own aging depend on (a) the current level of individual resources, (b) changes in the level of individual resources, or (c) the increasing age of older persons. The present study examined the relations between individual physical, mental, and cognitive resources and the attitudes toward one's own aging. The study was conducted with N=500 participants of the Interdisciplinary Longitudinal Study of Adult Development (ILSE) born between 1930 and 1932 (age: M=63.0, SD=0.9 at T1 and M=66.9, SD=0.9 at T2). The results indicate that the attitudes toward one's own aging (a) become more negative with increasing age, (b) most strongly depend on the available resources, (c) changes in level of resources contribute to the prediction of the attitudes toward one's own aging, and (d) age acts more as a reinforcing factor on the relation between resources and attitudes than as an independent factor on the attitudes toward one's own aging.

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4 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
06 Faculty of Arts > Center for Gerontology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology
Language:German
Date:2008
Deposited On:07 Nov 2008 13:39
Last Modified:02 May 2016 07:43
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0948-6704
Additional Information:The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
Publisher DOI:10.1007/s00391-007-0451-5
PubMed ID:18286326
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-5142

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