UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Evaluation of two devices for point-of-care testing of haemoglobin in neonatal pigs


Kutter, A P N; Mauch, J Y; Riond, B; Martin-Jurado, O; Spielmann, N; Weiss, M; Bettschart-Wolfensberger, R (2012). Evaluation of two devices for point-of-care testing of haemoglobin in neonatal pigs. Laboratory Animals, 46(1):65-70.

Abstract

In veterinary medicine, point-of-care testing (POCT) techniques have become popular, since they provide immediate results and only small amounts of blood are needed. However, their accuracy is controversial. Pigs are often used for research purposes and accurate measurement of haemoglobin (Hb) is important during invasive procedures. The aim of this study was to evaluate two different Hb POCT devices in neonatal pigs. A prospective study with 57 pigs of 3–6 weeks of age, weighing 4.1–6.2 kg (median 5.1 kg) was performed. Fifty-seven blood samples were analysed for Hb using a conductivity-based and a photometrical POCT device and compared with a photometrical reference method. Statistical analysis was performed with Bland–Altman analysis, Spearman correlation and Passing–Bablok regression analysis. Hb values ranged from 32 to 108 g/L (median 80 g/L) using the reference method. The bias of the photometrical method (HemoCue®) to the reference method was −1 g/L, with limits of agreement (LOA) of −7 to 6 g/L. The conductivity-based method (i-STAT®) had a bias of −15 g/L with LOA from −24 to −6 g/L. There was a significant association between protein values and the bias of i-STAT versus CellDyn (r2 = 0.27, P < 0.05) but not with the bias of HemoCue versus CellDyn (r2 = 0.001, P = 0.79). The lower the protein values were, the lower the Hb values were measured by the i-STAT. The conductivity-based measurement of Hb constantly underestimated Hb values, whereas the photometrical method demonstrated a better accuracy and is therefore more reliable for on-site measurement of Hb in pigs.

In veterinary medicine, point-of-care testing (POCT) techniques have become popular, since they provide immediate results and only small amounts of blood are needed. However, their accuracy is controversial. Pigs are often used for research purposes and accurate measurement of haemoglobin (Hb) is important during invasive procedures. The aim of this study was to evaluate two different Hb POCT devices in neonatal pigs. A prospective study with 57 pigs of 3–6 weeks of age, weighing 4.1–6.2 kg (median 5.1 kg) was performed. Fifty-seven blood samples were analysed for Hb using a conductivity-based and a photometrical POCT device and compared with a photometrical reference method. Statistical analysis was performed with Bland–Altman analysis, Spearman correlation and Passing–Bablok regression analysis. Hb values ranged from 32 to 108 g/L (median 80 g/L) using the reference method. The bias of the photometrical method (HemoCue®) to the reference method was −1 g/L, with limits of agreement (LOA) of −7 to 6 g/L. The conductivity-based method (i-STAT®) had a bias of −15 g/L with LOA from −24 to −6 g/L. There was a significant association between protein values and the bias of i-STAT versus CellDyn (r2 = 0.27, P < 0.05) but not with the bias of HemoCue versus CellDyn (r2 = 0.001, P = 0.79). The lower the protein values were, the lower the Hb values were measured by the i-STAT. The conductivity-based measurement of Hb constantly underestimated Hb values, whereas the photometrical method demonstrated a better accuracy and is therefore more reliable for on-site measurement of Hb in pigs.

Citations

4 citations in Web of Science®
4 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

4 downloads since deposited on 06 Dec 2011
1 download since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Surgery
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Equine Department
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Farm Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:06 Dec 2011 08:12
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:08
Publisher:Royal Society of Medicine
ISSN:0023-6772
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1258/la.2011.011086
PubMed ID:22087030
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-51616

Download

[img]
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF (Epub ahead of print version) - Registered users only
Size: 161kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations