UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Phenotypic correlates and consequences of dispersal in a metapopulation of house sparrows Passer domesticus.


Altwegg, R; Ringsby, T H; Seather, B E (2000). Phenotypic correlates and consequences of dispersal in a metapopulation of house sparrows Passer domesticus. Journal of Animal Ecology, 69(5):762-770.

Abstract

1. We examine causes and consequences of natal dispersal within a metapopulation of house sparrows Passer domesticus in an archipelago in Northern Norway where a large proportion of the individuals is colour-ringed.

2. Less than 10% of the fledglings dispersed, i.e. left their natal island.

3. Dispersal was female biased and almost exclusively performed by juveniles.

4. The probability of natal dispersal was not related either to the body condition or the body mass of the juvenile. Similarly, neither clutch size nor hatching date explained a significant proportion of the variance in the probability of dispersal.

5. The probability of male natal dispersal was related to the rank of the fledgling in the size-hierarchy within the brood. Low ranking individuals that hatched early in the season were more likely to disperse.

6. In both sexes, the survival of dispersers at the island of establishment was higher than among the residents on that island. Similarly, dispersers survived better than adults that remained on their island of birth.

7. These results suggest that dispersal may be an adaptive strategy to avoid poor conditions in the natal area.

Abstract

1. We examine causes and consequences of natal dispersal within a metapopulation of house sparrows Passer domesticus in an archipelago in Northern Norway where a large proportion of the individuals is colour-ringed.

2. Less than 10% of the fledglings dispersed, i.e. left their natal island.

3. Dispersal was female biased and almost exclusively performed by juveniles.

4. The probability of natal dispersal was not related either to the body condition or the body mass of the juvenile. Similarly, neither clutch size nor hatching date explained a significant proportion of the variance in the probability of dispersal.

5. The probability of male natal dispersal was related to the rank of the fledgling in the size-hierarchy within the brood. Low ranking individuals that hatched early in the season were more likely to disperse.

6. In both sexes, the survival of dispersers at the island of establishment was higher than among the residents on that island. Similarly, dispersers survived better than adults that remained on their island of birth.

7. These results suggest that dispersal may be an adaptive strategy to avoid poor conditions in the natal area.

Citations

62 citations in Web of Science®
61 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

41 downloads since deposited on 11 Feb 2008
24 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Zoology (former)
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:September 2000
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:15
Last Modified:25 May 2016 07:01
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0021-8790
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2656.2000.00431.x

Download

[img]
Preview
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 167kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations