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Interactive effects of drought and N fertilization on the spatial distribution of methane assimilation in grassland soils


Stiehl-Braun, P A; Hartmann, A A; Kandeler, E; Buchmann, N; Niklaus, P A (2011). Interactive effects of drought and N fertilization on the spatial distribution of methane assimilation in grassland soils. Global Change Biology, 17(8):2629-2639.

Abstract

Soil methanotrophic bacteria constitute the only globally relevant biological sink for atmospheric methane (CH4). Nitrogen (N) fertilizers as well as soil moisture regime affect the activity of these organisms, but the mechanisms involved are not well understood to date. In particular, virtually nothing is known about the spatial distribution of soil methanotrophs within soil structure and how this regulates CH4 fluxes at the ecosystem scale. We studied the spatial distribution of CH4 assimilation and its response to a factorial drought

Soil methanotrophic bacteria constitute the only globally relevant biological sink for atmospheric methane (CH4). Nitrogen (N) fertilizers as well as soil moisture regime affect the activity of these organisms, but the mechanisms involved are not well understood to date. In particular, virtually nothing is known about the spatial distribution of soil methanotrophs within soil structure and how this regulates CH4 fluxes at the ecosystem scale. We studied the spatial distribution of CH4 assimilation and its response to a factorial drought

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23 citations in Web of Science®
24 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Uncontrolled Keywords:14C labelling, atmospheric methane, carbon isotopes, climate change, grazing effects, scaling, soil aggregate structure, soil micro-organisms
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:12 Dec 2011 11:54
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:12
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:1354-1013
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2486.2011.02410.x

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