UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Effect of high dose per pulse flattening filter-free beams on cancer cell survival


Lohse, I; Lang, S; Hrbacek, J; Scheidegger, S; Bodis, S; Macedo, N; Feng, J; Lütolf, U M; Zaugg, K (2011). Effect of high dose per pulse flattening filter-free beams on cancer cell survival. Radiotherapy and Oncology, 101(1):226-232.

Abstract

The results presented here show that dose per pulse might become a crucial factor which influences cancer cell survival. Using high dose rates, currently used radiobiological models as well as molecular mechanisms involved urgently need to be re-examined.

The results presented here show that dose per pulse might become a crucial factor which influences cancer cell survival. Using high dose rates, currently used radiobiological models as well as molecular mechanisms involved urgently need to be re-examined.

Citations

31 citations in Web of Science®
31 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 16 Dec 2011
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Radiation Oncology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:16 Dec 2011 11:15
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:13
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0167-8140
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.radonc.2011.05.072
PubMed ID:21733592
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-52593

Download

[img]
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 639kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations