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Split-rib reconstruction of the frontal sinus: two cases and literature review.


Soyka, M B; Guggenheim, M; Arnoux, A; Holzmann, D (2011). Split-rib reconstruction of the frontal sinus: two cases and literature review. The Journal of laryngology and otology, 125(12):1301-8.

Abstract

Background:Large defects of the anterior wall of the frontal sinus require closure using either autologous or foreign material. In cases of osteomyelitis, the reconstruction must be resistant to bacterial infection. Split-rib osteoplasty can be used in different sites.Methods:Two patients with malignant sinonasal tumours underwent repeated treatment, and subsequently developed osteomyelitis of the frontal bone. After adequate therapy, a large defect of the anterior wall persisted. Reconstruction was performed using the split-rib method. The literature on this topic was reviewed.Results:Both patients' treatment were successful. No complications occurred. A PubMed search on the topic of rib reconstruction of the frontal sinus and skull was performed; 18 publications matched the inclusion criteria. From these sources, we noted that 182 reconstructions yielded good results with few complications.Conclusion:Large defects of the anterior wall of the frontal sinus can be closed successfully using autologous split-rib grafting. Aesthetic outcome is good and donor site morbidity is minimal.

Background:Large defects of the anterior wall of the frontal sinus require closure using either autologous or foreign material. In cases of osteomyelitis, the reconstruction must be resistant to bacterial infection. Split-rib osteoplasty can be used in different sites.Methods:Two patients with malignant sinonasal tumours underwent repeated treatment, and subsequently developed osteomyelitis of the frontal bone. After adequate therapy, a large defect of the anterior wall persisted. Reconstruction was performed using the split-rib method. The literature on this topic was reviewed.Results:Both patients' treatment were successful. No complications occurred. A PubMed search on the topic of rib reconstruction of the frontal sinus and skull was performed; 18 publications matched the inclusion criteria. From these sources, we noted that 182 reconstructions yielded good results with few complications.Conclusion:Large defects of the anterior wall of the frontal sinus can be closed successfully using autologous split-rib grafting. Aesthetic outcome is good and donor site morbidity is minimal.

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1 citation in Web of Science®
1 citation in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Division of Surgical Research
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Otorhinolaryngology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Reconstructive Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Date:2011
Deposited On:14 Dec 2011 10:04
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:14
Publisher:Cambridge University Press
ISSN:0022-2151
Additional Information:Copyright: Cambridge University Press
Free access at:Official URL. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1017/S0022215111002611
Official URL:http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=8438609
Related URLs:http://journals.cambridge.org/download.php?file=%2FJLO%2FJLO125_12%2FS0022215111002611a.pdf&code=72edd39cc17c57a31e3a1a9fe14560df (Publisher)
PubMed ID:22017793
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-52949

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