UZH-Logo

High-dose steroid treatment increases free water transport in peritoneal dialysis patients


de Arteaga, J; Ledesma, F; Garay, G; Chiurchiu, C; de la Fuente, J; Douthat, W; Massari, P; Terryn, S; Devuyst, O (2011). High-dose steroid treatment increases free water transport in peritoneal dialysis patients. Nephrology, Dialysis, Transplantation, 26(12):4142-4145.

Abstract

The water channel aquaporin-1 (AQP1) is the molecular counterpart of the ultrasmall pore that mediates free water transport during peritoneal dialysis (PD). Proof-of-principle studies performed in rats have shown that treatment with corticosteroids upregulates the expression of AQP1 in the peritoneal capillaries, causing a significant increase in free water transport. Whether such a beneficial effect could be observed in end-stage renal disease patients treated by PD remains unknown. Peritoneal transport parameters were evaluated in three patients on PD, shortly before and after living-donor renal transplantation and treatment with high-dose methylprednisolone (1.0-1.2 g/m(2)). As compared with pre-transplantation values, the post-transplantation test revealed an ∼2-fold increase in the sodium sieving and ultrasmall pore ultrafiltration volume, suggesting an effect on AQP1 water channels. In contrast, there was no change in the parameters of small solute transport. The direct involvement of AQP1 in these changes is suggested by the expression of glucocorticoid receptors in the human peritoneum and the presence of conserved glucocorticoid response elements in the promoter of the human AQP1 gene.

The water channel aquaporin-1 (AQP1) is the molecular counterpart of the ultrasmall pore that mediates free water transport during peritoneal dialysis (PD). Proof-of-principle studies performed in rats have shown that treatment with corticosteroids upregulates the expression of AQP1 in the peritoneal capillaries, causing a significant increase in free water transport. Whether such a beneficial effect could be observed in end-stage renal disease patients treated by PD remains unknown. Peritoneal transport parameters were evaluated in three patients on PD, shortly before and after living-donor renal transplantation and treatment with high-dose methylprednisolone (1.0-1.2 g/m(2)). As compared with pre-transplantation values, the post-transplantation test revealed an ∼2-fold increase in the sodium sieving and ultrasmall pore ultrafiltration volume, suggesting an effect on AQP1 water channels. In contrast, there was no change in the parameters of small solute transport. The direct involvement of AQP1 in these changes is suggested by the expression of glucocorticoid receptors in the human peritoneum and the presence of conserved glucocorticoid response elements in the promoter of the human AQP1 gene.

Citations

7 citations in Web of Science®
8 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

46 downloads since deposited on 11 Jan 2012
19 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Physiology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Physiology

04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:11 Jan 2012 11:44
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:15
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0931-0509
Additional Information:This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version de Arteaga, J; Ledesma, F; Garay, G; Chiurchiu, C; de la Fuente, J; Douthat, W; Massari, P; Terryn, S; Devuyst, O (2011). High-dose steroid treatment increases free water transport in peritoneal dialysis patients. Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, 26(12):4142-4145 is available online at: http://ndt.oxfordjournals.org/content/26/12/4142.long
Publisher DOI:10.1093/ndt/gfr533
PubMed ID:21940485
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-53203

Download

[img]
Preview
Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 406kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations