UZH-Logo

Water storage in a till catchment. II: Implications of transmissivity feedback for flow paths and turnover times


Bishop, K; Seibert, Jan; Nyberg, L; Rodhe, A (2011). Water storage in a till catchment. II: Implications of transmissivity feedback for flow paths and turnover times. Hydrological Processes, 25(25):3950-3959.

Abstract

This paper explores the flow paths and turnover times within a catchment characterized by the transmissivity feedback mechanism where there is a strong increase in the saturated hydraulic conductivity towards the soil surface and precipitation inputs saturate progressively more superficial layers of the soil profile. The analysis is facilitated by the correlation between catchment water storage and groundwater levels which made it possible to model the daily spatial distribution of water storage, both vertically in different soil horizons and horizontally across a 6,300 m2 till catchment. Soil properties and episodic
precipitation input dynamics, combined with the influence of topographic features, concentrate flow in the horizontal, vertical and temporal dimensions. Within the soil profile, there was a vertical concentration of lateral flow to superficial soil horizons (upper 30 cm of the soil), where much of the annual flow occurred during runoff episodes. Overland flow from a limited portion of the catchment can contribute to peak flows, but is not a necessary condition for runoff episodes. The spatial concentration of flow, and the episodic nature of runoff events, resulted in a strong and spatially structured differentiation of local flow velocities within the catchment. There were large differences in the time spent by the laterally flowing water at different depths, with turnover times of lateral flow across a one m wide soil pedon ranging from under one hour at 10-20 cm depth to a month at 70-80 cm depth. In many regards, the hydrology of this catchment appears typical of the hydrology in till soils which are widespread in Fenno-Scandia.

This paper explores the flow paths and turnover times within a catchment characterized by the transmissivity feedback mechanism where there is a strong increase in the saturated hydraulic conductivity towards the soil surface and precipitation inputs saturate progressively more superficial layers of the soil profile. The analysis is facilitated by the correlation between catchment water storage and groundwater levels which made it possible to model the daily spatial distribution of water storage, both vertically in different soil horizons and horizontally across a 6,300 m2 till catchment. Soil properties and episodic
precipitation input dynamics, combined with the influence of topographic features, concentrate flow in the horizontal, vertical and temporal dimensions. Within the soil profile, there was a vertical concentration of lateral flow to superficial soil horizons (upper 30 cm of the soil), where much of the annual flow occurred during runoff episodes. Overland flow from a limited portion of the catchment can contribute to peak flows, but is not a necessary condition for runoff episodes. The spatial concentration of flow, and the episodic nature of runoff events, resulted in a strong and spatially structured differentiation of local flow velocities within the catchment. There were large differences in the time spent by the laterally flowing water at different depths, with turnover times of lateral flow across a one m wide soil pedon ranging from under one hour at 10-20 cm depth to a month at 70-80 cm depth. In many regards, the hydrology of this catchment appears typical of the hydrology in till soils which are widespread in Fenno-Scandia.

Citations

24 citations in Web of Science®
21 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

4 downloads since deposited on 12 Jan 2012
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:12 Jan 2012 16:02
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:15
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0885-6087
Publisher DOI:10.1002/hyp.8355
Related URLs:http://www.zora.uzh.ch/53270/
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-53273

Download

[img]
Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 1MB
View at publisher
[img]
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 308kB

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations