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Botulinum toxin A (Botox) intradetrusor injections in adults with neurogenic detrusor overactivity/neurogenic overactive bladder: a systematic literature review


Karsenty, G; Denys, P; Amarenco, G; De Seze, M; Gamé, X; Haab, F; Kerdraon, J; Perrouin-Verbe, B; Ruffion, A; Saussine, C; Soler, J M; Schurch, B; Chartier-Kastler, E (2008). Botulinum toxin A (Botox) intradetrusor injections in adults with neurogenic detrusor overactivity/neurogenic overactive bladder: a systematic literature review. European Urology, 53(2):275-287.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: This systematic literature review discusses the efficacy and safety of botulinum toxin type A (Botox) intradetrusor injections in adults with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) and urinary incontinence or overactive bladder symptoms of neurogenic origin (NOAB). METHODS: A MEDLINE and EMBASE search for clinical studies with botulinum toxin A injected into the detrusor of adults with NDO was performed. For several efficacy and safety variables data were extracted by one person and independently quality-controlled by another person. Extracted data were reviewed to propose recommendations for use in clinical practice based on level of evidence and expert opinion. RESULTS: A total of 18 articles evaluating the efficacy or safety of Botox in patients with NDO and incontinence/NOAB resistant to antimuscarinic therapy, with or without clean intermittent self-catheterisation (CIC), were selected. The amount of Botox injected was mostly 300 U, usually as 30 injections of 10 U/ml in the bladder (excluding the trigone) under cystoscopic guidance and with different types of anaesthesia. Most of the studies reported a significant improvement in clinical (approximately 40-80% of patients became completely dry between CICs) as well as urodynamic (in most studies mean maximum detrusor pressure was reduced to < or =40 cm H(2)O) variables and in the patients' quality of life, without major adverse events. CONCLUSIONS: Botox injections into the detrusor provide a clinically significant improvement in adults with NDO and incontinence/NOAB refractory to antimuscarinics. It seems to be very well tolerated. However, more adequately powered, well-designed, randomised, controlled studies evaluating the optimal dose, number and location of injections, impact on antimuscarinic regimen and CIC use, duration of effect, and when to perform repeat injections are warranted.

OBJECTIVES: This systematic literature review discusses the efficacy and safety of botulinum toxin type A (Botox) intradetrusor injections in adults with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) and urinary incontinence or overactive bladder symptoms of neurogenic origin (NOAB). METHODS: A MEDLINE and EMBASE search for clinical studies with botulinum toxin A injected into the detrusor of adults with NDO was performed. For several efficacy and safety variables data were extracted by one person and independently quality-controlled by another person. Extracted data were reviewed to propose recommendations for use in clinical practice based on level of evidence and expert opinion. RESULTS: A total of 18 articles evaluating the efficacy or safety of Botox in patients with NDO and incontinence/NOAB resistant to antimuscarinic therapy, with or without clean intermittent self-catheterisation (CIC), were selected. The amount of Botox injected was mostly 300 U, usually as 30 injections of 10 U/ml in the bladder (excluding the trigone) under cystoscopic guidance and with different types of anaesthesia. Most of the studies reported a significant improvement in clinical (approximately 40-80% of patients became completely dry between CICs) as well as urodynamic (in most studies mean maximum detrusor pressure was reduced to < or =40 cm H(2)O) variables and in the patients' quality of life, without major adverse events. CONCLUSIONS: Botox injections into the detrusor provide a clinically significant improvement in adults with NDO and incontinence/NOAB refractory to antimuscarinics. It seems to be very well tolerated. However, more adequately powered, well-designed, randomised, controlled studies evaluating the optimal dose, number and location of injections, impact on antimuscarinic regimen and CIC use, duration of effect, and when to perform repeat injections are warranted.

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123 citations in Web of Science®
156 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:February 2008
Deposited On:17 Nov 2008 16:17
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:33
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0302-2838
Publisher DOI:10.1016/j.eururo.2007.10.013
PubMed ID:17988791

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