UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Detecting Amyloid-β Plaques in Alzheimer’s Disease


Baltes, C; Princz-Kranz, F; Rudin, M; Mueggler, T (2010). Detecting Amyloid-β Plaques in Alzheimer’s Disease. In: Modo, M; Bulte, J W M. Magnetic Resonance Neuroimaging. New York: Springer, 511-533.

Abstract

One of the major neuropathological changes characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is deposits of beta-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in neocortical and subcortical regions of the AD brain. The histochemical detection of these lesions in postmortem brain tissue is necessary for definitive diagnosis of AD. Methods for their in vivo detection would greatly aid the diagnosis of AD in early stages when neuronal loss and related functional impairment are still limited and would also open the opportunity for effective therapeutic interventions. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) theoretically provides the spatial resolution needed to resolve amyloid-β plaques. Although currently limited for clinical applications due to unfavorable long acquisition times, MRI has been used to visualize Aβ plaques in AD mouse models. The ability to detect amyloid-positive brain lesions in vivo using non-invasive imaging would allow to track disease progression and to monitor the efficacy of potential therapies in disease-modifying studies using transgenic models resembling AD pathology. Here, we provide MRI protocols for in vivo (mouse) and ex vivo (AD tissue samples) amyloid plaque imaging and the procedure for correlating these with thioflavin-S and iron-staining histology. Current challenges and limitations are discussed.

One of the major neuropathological changes characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is deposits of beta-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in neocortical and subcortical regions of the AD brain. The histochemical detection of these lesions in postmortem brain tissue is necessary for definitive diagnosis of AD. Methods for their in vivo detection would greatly aid the diagnosis of AD in early stages when neuronal loss and related functional impairment are still limited and would also open the opportunity for effective therapeutic interventions. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) theoretically provides the spatial resolution needed to resolve amyloid-β plaques. Although currently limited for clinical applications due to unfavorable long acquisition times, MRI has been used to visualize Aβ plaques in AD mouse models. The ability to detect amyloid-positive brain lesions in vivo using non-invasive imaging would allow to track disease progression and to monitor the efficacy of potential therapies in disease-modifying studies using transgenic models resembling AD pathology. Here, we provide MRI protocols for in vivo (mouse) and ex vivo (AD tissue samples) amyloid plaque imaging and the procedure for correlating these with thioflavin-S and iron-staining histology. Current challenges and limitations are discussed.

Citations

8 citations in Web of Science®
7 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, not refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Engineering
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
170 Ethics
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:13 Jan 2012 10:28
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:17
Publisher:Springer
Series Name:Methods in molecular biology
Number:711
ISSN:1064-3745
ISBN:978-1-61737-991-8
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-61737-992-5_26
Related URLs:http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-61737-992-5
PubMed ID:21279620

Download

Full text not available from this repository.View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations