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Clinical evaluation of cochlear implant sound coding taking into account conjectural masking functions, MP3000™


Abstract

Efficacy of the SPEAK and ACE coding strategies was compared with that of a new strategy, MP3000™, by 37 European implant centers including 221 subjects. The SPEAK and ACE strategies are based on selection of 8–10 spectral components with the highest levels, while MP3000 is based on the selection of only 4–6 components, with the highest levels relative to an estimate of the spread of masking. The pulse rate per component was fixed. No significant difference was found for the speech scores and for coding
preference between the SPEAK/ACE and MP3000 strategies. Battery life was 24% longer for the MP3000 strategy. With MP3000 the best results were found for a selection of six components. In addition, the best results were found for a masking function with a low-frequency slope of 50 dB/Bark and a high-frequency slope of 37 dB/Bark (50/37) as compared to the other combinations examined of 40/30 and 20/15 dB/ Bark. The best results found for the steepest slopes do not seem to agree with current estimates of the
spread of masking in electrical stimulation. Future research might reveal if performance with respect to
SPEAK/ACE can be enhanced by increasing the number of channels in MP3000 beyond 4–6 and it should shed more light on the optimum steepness of the slopes of the masking functions applied in MP3000.

Efficacy of the SPEAK and ACE coding strategies was compared with that of a new strategy, MP3000™, by 37 European implant centers including 221 subjects. The SPEAK and ACE strategies are based on selection of 8–10 spectral components with the highest levels, while MP3000 is based on the selection of only 4–6 components, with the highest levels relative to an estimate of the spread of masking. The pulse rate per component was fixed. No significant difference was found for the speech scores and for coding
preference between the SPEAK/ACE and MP3000 strategies. Battery life was 24% longer for the MP3000 strategy. With MP3000 the best results were found for a selection of six components. In addition, the best results were found for a masking function with a low-frequency slope of 50 dB/Bark and a high-frequency slope of 37 dB/Bark (50/37) as compared to the other combinations examined of 40/30 and 20/15 dB/ Bark. The best results found for the steepest slopes do not seem to agree with current estimates of the
spread of masking in electrical stimulation. Future research might reveal if performance with respect to
SPEAK/ACE can be enhanced by increasing the number of channels in MP3000 beyond 4–6 and it should shed more light on the optimum steepness of the slopes of the masking functions applied in MP3000.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Otorhinolaryngology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:November 2011
Deposited On:23 Dec 2011 09:21
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:18
Publisher:Maney Publishing
ISSN:1467-0100
Publisher DOI:10.1179/1754762811Y0000000009
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-53839

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