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Permanent URL to this publication: http://dx.doi.org/10.5167/uzh-5391

Dip, R (2009). Adenosine receptor modulation: Potential implications in veterinary medicine. The Veterinary Journal, 179(1):38-49.

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Abstract

Adenosine is a purine nucleoside whose concentration increases during inflammation and hypoxia and the many roles of this molecule are becoming better understood. Increased reactivity to adenosine of the airways of asthmatic but not of normal subjects underlines the role of adenosine in airway inflammation. The identification and pharmacological characterisation of different adenosine receptors have
stimulated the search for subtype-specific ligands able to modulate the effects of this molecule in a directed way. Several compounds of different chemical classes have been identified as having potential drawbacks, including side effects resulting from the broad distribution of the receptors across the organism, have prevented clinical application. In this article, the effects of adenosine’s different receptors and the intracellular signalling pathways are reviewed. The potential of adenosine receptor modulation as a therapeutic target for chronic airway inflammation is considered, taking equine recurrent airway
disease and feline asthma as examples of naturally occurring airway obstructive diseases. Other potential applications for adenosine receptor modulation are also discussed. As the intrinsic molecular events of adenosine’s mechanism of action become uncovered, new concrete therapeutic approaches will become available for the treatment of various conditions in veterinary medicine.

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Pharmacology and Toxicology
DDC:570 Life sciences; biology
Uncontrolled Keywords:Adenosine; Adenosine receptors; Signal transduction; Chronic airway inflammation; Veterinary inflammatory conditions
Language:English
Date:January 2009
Deposited On:20 Mar 2009 15:13
Last Modified:27 Nov 2013 20:20
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1090-0233
Publisher DOI:10.1016/j.tvjl.2007.08.005
PubMed ID:17904398
Citations:Web of Science®. Times Cited: 7
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