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Soluble Klotho and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease


Pavik, I; Jaeger, P; Ebner, L; Poster, D; Krauer, F; Kistler, A D; Rentsch, K; Andreisek, G; Wagner, C A; Devuyst, O; Wüthrich, R P; Schmid, C; Serra, A L (2012). Soluble Klotho and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, 7(2):248-257.

Abstract

Background and objectivesFibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) levels are elevated in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH), but only the latter is characterized by a renal phosphate wasting phenotype. This study explored potential mechanisms underlying resistance to FGF23 in ADPKD.Design, setting, participants, & measurementsFGF23 and Klotho levels were measured, and renal phosphate transport was evaluated by calculating the ratio of the maximum rate of tubular phosphate reabsorption to GFR (TmP/GFR) in 99 ADPKD patients, 32 CKD patients, 12 XLH patients, and 20 healthy volunteers. ADPKD and CKD patients were classified by estimated GFR (CKD stage 1, ≥90 ml/min per 1.73 m(2); CKD stage 2, 60-89 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)).ResultsADPKD patients had 50% higher FGF23 levels than did XLH patients; TmP/GFR was near normal in most ADPKD patients and very low in XLH patients. Serum Klotho levels were lowest in the ADPKD group, whereas the CKD and XLH groups and volunteers had similar levels. ADPKD patients with an apparent renal phosphate leak had two-fold higher Klotho levels than those without. Serum Klotho values correlated inversely with cyst volume and kidney growth.ConclusionsLoss of Klotho might be a consequence of cyst growth and constrain the phosphaturic effect of FGF23 in most patients with ADPKD. Normal serum Klotho levels were associated with normal FGF23 biologic activity in all XLH patients and a minority of ADPKD patients. Loss of Klotho and FGF23 increase appear to exceed and precede the changes that can be explained by loss of GFR in patients with ADPKD.

Abstract

Background and objectivesFibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) levels are elevated in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH), but only the latter is characterized by a renal phosphate wasting phenotype. This study explored potential mechanisms underlying resistance to FGF23 in ADPKD.Design, setting, participants, & measurementsFGF23 and Klotho levels were measured, and renal phosphate transport was evaluated by calculating the ratio of the maximum rate of tubular phosphate reabsorption to GFR (TmP/GFR) in 99 ADPKD patients, 32 CKD patients, 12 XLH patients, and 20 healthy volunteers. ADPKD and CKD patients were classified by estimated GFR (CKD stage 1, ≥90 ml/min per 1.73 m(2); CKD stage 2, 60-89 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)).ResultsADPKD patients had 50% higher FGF23 levels than did XLH patients; TmP/GFR was near normal in most ADPKD patients and very low in XLH patients. Serum Klotho levels were lowest in the ADPKD group, whereas the CKD and XLH groups and volunteers had similar levels. ADPKD patients with an apparent renal phosphate leak had two-fold higher Klotho levels than those without. Serum Klotho values correlated inversely with cyst volume and kidney growth.ConclusionsLoss of Klotho might be a consequence of cyst growth and constrain the phosphaturic effect of FGF23 in most patients with ADPKD. Normal serum Klotho levels were associated with normal FGF23 biologic activity in all XLH patients and a minority of ADPKD patients. Loss of Klotho and FGF23 increase appear to exceed and precede the changes that can be explained by loss of GFR in patients with ADPKD.

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Physiology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Physiology

04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Endocrinology and Diabetology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:15 Jan 2012 18:01
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:19
Publisher:American Society of Nephrology
ISSN:1555-9041
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.2215/CJN.09020911
PubMed ID:22193235

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