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A case of a canine pigmented plaque associated with the presence of a Chi-papillomavirus


Lange, C E; Tobler, K; Lehner, A; Vetsch, E; Favrot, C (2012). A case of a canine pigmented plaque associated with the presence of a Chi-papillomavirus. Veterinary Dermatology, 23(1):76-e19.

Abstract

The seven fully described canine papillomaviruses (CPVs) have been allocated by sequence comparison and other genetic features into three phylogenetic clades. This largely reflects clinical findings, so each sequence of a newly discovered CPV in combination with clinical and pathological details is a valuable piece of evidence. We hypothesize that the genomic sequence of a new CPV can help to predict clinical features and progression, and that this can be tested in subsequent cases. In this case, a 2-year-old female dachshund-mix presented with papillomatosis clinically and histologically characterized as pigmented viral plaques. PCRs using primers evaluated for CPVs successfully amplified papillomavirus (PV) DNA. Sequencing of the products revealed an unknown PV putatively belonging to the PV genus Chi. Rolling circle amplification was used to amplify the entire viral genome. Sequencing revealed a novel PV, designated as CPV8, which was most closely related (63% homology) to the recently discovered CPV4. CPV4 is associated with benign pigmented plaques in pugs. Phylogenetic analysis based on the nucleotide sequences of four viral genes showed that the novel virus was closest to CPV3, CPV4 and CPV5. The presence of viral DNA was confirmed in the lesions by in situ hybridization using specific probes. CPV8 may consequently be regarded as the fourth member of the Chi-papillomavirus genus. All viruses belonging to this genus induce pigmented plaques in dogs. These findings support the hypothesis that genomic sequences can be useful in predicting the clinical features of CPV infection.

The seven fully described canine papillomaviruses (CPVs) have been allocated by sequence comparison and other genetic features into three phylogenetic clades. This largely reflects clinical findings, so each sequence of a newly discovered CPV in combination with clinical and pathological details is a valuable piece of evidence. We hypothesize that the genomic sequence of a new CPV can help to predict clinical features and progression, and that this can be tested in subsequent cases. In this case, a 2-year-old female dachshund-mix presented with papillomatosis clinically and histologically characterized as pigmented viral plaques. PCRs using primers evaluated for CPVs successfully amplified papillomavirus (PV) DNA. Sequencing of the products revealed an unknown PV putatively belonging to the PV genus Chi. Rolling circle amplification was used to amplify the entire viral genome. Sequencing revealed a novel PV, designated as CPV8, which was most closely related (63% homology) to the recently discovered CPV4. CPV4 is associated with benign pigmented plaques in pugs. Phylogenetic analysis based on the nucleotide sequences of four viral genes showed that the novel virus was closest to CPV3, CPV4 and CPV5. The presence of viral DNA was confirmed in the lesions by in situ hybridization using specific probes. CPV8 may consequently be regarded as the fourth member of the Chi-papillomavirus genus. All viruses belonging to this genus induce pigmented plaques in dogs. These findings support the hypothesis that genomic sequences can be useful in predicting the clinical features of CPV infection.

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6 citations in Web of Science®
10 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Food Safety and Hygiene
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Virology
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:27 Jan 2012 12:33
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:20
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0959-4493
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-3164.2011.01007.x
PubMed ID:21883544
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-54385

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