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Shoaling behaviour in a surface-dwelling and a cave-dwelling population of a barb Garra barreimiae (Cyprinidae, Teleostei).


Timmermann, M; Schlupp, I; Plath, M (2004). Shoaling behaviour in a surface-dwelling and a cave-dwelling population of a barb Garra barreimiae (Cyprinidae, Teleostei). Acta Ethologica, 7(2):59-64.

Abstract

Abstract We studied shoaling behaviour in a species of fish (Garra barreimiae) from Oman. We compared two populations (a surface-dwelling and a cave-dwelling population) with different theoretical costs and benefits of shoaling. We measured the tendency to associate with a shoal of conspecifics. The stimulus shoal was confined to (1) clear Plexiglas cylinders in light, (2) wire-mesh cylinders in light, or (3) wire-mesh cylinders in darkness. The surface form exhibited a strong preference for the stimulus shoal during the experiments in light, but also in darkness, when only non-visual cues from the shoal could be perceived. The cave form did not show a preference when solely visual cues were available (Plexiglas cylinder). When non-visual cues from the shoal could be perceived (wire-mesh), the cave form did show a preference to associate with the shoal, but the shoaling tendency was considerably weaker than in the surface form. The shoaling tendency has probably been genetically reduced in the cave form.

Abstract We studied shoaling behaviour in a species of fish (Garra barreimiae) from Oman. We compared two populations (a surface-dwelling and a cave-dwelling population) with different theoretical costs and benefits of shoaling. We measured the tendency to associate with a shoal of conspecifics. The stimulus shoal was confined to (1) clear Plexiglas cylinders in light, (2) wire-mesh cylinders in light, or (3) wire-mesh cylinders in darkness. The surface form exhibited a strong preference for the stimulus shoal during the experiments in light, but also in darkness, when only non-visual cues from the shoal could be perceived. The cave form did not show a preference when solely visual cues were available (Plexiglas cylinder). When non-visual cues from the shoal could be perceived (wire-mesh), the cave form did show a preference to associate with the shoal, but the shoaling tendency was considerably weaker than in the surface form. The shoaling tendency has probably been genetically reduced in the cave form.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Zoology (former)
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:2004
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:16
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:14
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0873-9749
Publisher DOI:10.1007/s10211-004-0099-8

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