UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Provisioning behaviour in relation to food availability and nestling food demand in the Water Pipit Anthus spinoletta.


Rauter, C; Brodmann, P A; Reyer, H U (1999). Provisioning behaviour in relation to food availability and nestling food demand in the Water Pipit Anthus spinoletta. Ardea, 88(1):81-90.

Abstract

Insufficient food provisioning by parents can reduce growth rate of altricial nestlings, their size and weight at fledging, and also affect survival. Therefore at low food availability, parents should increase their food provisioning effort. In insectivorous Water Pipits Anthus spinoletta prey biomass differed up to 50 times among home ranges; nevertheless, number, size and weight of fledglings did not differ between home ranges with low and high prey biomass. Based on predictions from the literature, we investigated whether and how parents adjust their provisioning behaviour to food availability, measured by arthropod biomass, and to nestling demands, measured by brood size, nestling age and ambient temperature. Foraging distances did not vary significantly with any of the four variables. Feeding rates were also not related to food availability, but increased with brood size in both sexes. In addition, females showed a tendency to increase feeding rate with decreasing air temperature. Our results suggest that, at least in some years, arthropod food is so abundant in the birds' environment that it does not limit reproductive success.

Insufficient food provisioning by parents can reduce growth rate of altricial nestlings, their size and weight at fledging, and also affect survival. Therefore at low food availability, parents should increase their food provisioning effort. In insectivorous Water Pipits Anthus spinoletta prey biomass differed up to 50 times among home ranges; nevertheless, number, size and weight of fledglings did not differ between home ranges with low and high prey biomass. Based on predictions from the literature, we investigated whether and how parents adjust their provisioning behaviour to food availability, measured by arthropod biomass, and to nestling demands, measured by brood size, nestling age and ambient temperature. Foraging distances did not vary significantly with any of the four variables. Feeding rates were also not related to food availability, but increased with brood size in both sexes. In addition, females showed a tendency to increase feeding rate with decreasing air temperature. Our results suggest that, at least in some years, arthropod food is so abundant in the birds' environment that it does not limit reproductive success.

Citations

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:11 November 1999
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:16
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:14
Publisher:Netherlands Ornithologists' Union
ISSN:0373-2266
Related URLs:http://nou.natuurinfo.nl/website/ardea/ardea_show_abstract.php?lang=uk&nr=87

Download

Full text not available from this repository.

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations