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Life satisfaction in patients with social anxiety disorder: Impact of cognitive-behavioral group therapy


Delsignore, A; Weidt, S; Emmerich, J; Rufer, M (2012). Life satisfaction in patients with social anxiety disorder: Impact of cognitive-behavioral group therapy. Mind & Brain, the Journal of Psychiatry, 3(2):9-14.

Abstract

This study focused on life satisfaction among patients with social anxiety disorder (SAD) and examined factors associated with gains in life satisfaction following cognitive-behavioral group therapy (CBGT). A sample of 121 patients with social anxiety disorder undergoing cognitive-behavioral group therapy was assessed in terms of domain-specific life satisfaction (FLZ) and symptomatology at baseline, posttreatment and 3-month follow-up. At baseline, patients showed decreased mean scores for life satisfaction especially in domains requiring social competence (friends, partnership, and family). Life satisfaction increased significantly in the course of CBGT and remained stable in the follow-up period. Symptom improvement was linked to life satisfaction gains during therapy. Men were more often singles and less satisfied with their partnership situation than women. Current partnership, employment, and no previous therapy experience were associated with higher life satisfaction at baseline. However, only the partnership situation was a positive predictor of life satisfaction gains at follow-up. In conclusion, our results showed that life satisfaction could be improved with CBGT for SAD. Additional interventions may be necessary to increase the satisfaction of men with their partnership situation and to support single patients in the practice of social skills outside of the group.

This study focused on life satisfaction among patients with social anxiety disorder (SAD) and examined factors associated with gains in life satisfaction following cognitive-behavioral group therapy (CBGT). A sample of 121 patients with social anxiety disorder undergoing cognitive-behavioral group therapy was assessed in terms of domain-specific life satisfaction (FLZ) and symptomatology at baseline, posttreatment and 3-month follow-up. At baseline, patients showed decreased mean scores for life satisfaction especially in domains requiring social competence (friends, partnership, and family). Life satisfaction increased significantly in the course of CBGT and remained stable in the follow-up period. Symptom improvement was linked to life satisfaction gains during therapy. Men were more often singles and less satisfied with their partnership situation than women. Current partnership, employment, and no previous therapy experience were associated with higher life satisfaction at baseline. However, only the partnership situation was a positive predictor of life satisfaction gains at follow-up. In conclusion, our results showed that life satisfaction could be improved with CBGT for SAD. Additional interventions may be necessary to increase the satisfaction of men with their partnership situation and to support single patients in the practice of social skills outside of the group.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:14 Jan 2012 18:13
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:23
Publisher:San Lucas Medical Ltd.
ISSN:2042-468X
Related URLs:http://www.slm-psychiatry.com (Publisher)
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-55300

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