Quick Search:

uzh logo
Browse by:
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet

Zurich Open Repository and Archive 

Permanent URL to this publication: http://dx.doi.org/10.5167/uzh-55548

Huelsmann, P M; Hofmann, A D; Knoepfel, S A; Popp, J; Rauch, P; Di Giallonardo, F; Danke, C; Gueckel, E; Schambach, A; Wolff, H; Metzner, K J; Berens, C (2011). A suicide gene approach using the human pro-apoptotic protein tBid inhibits HIV-1 replication. BMC Biotechnology, 11:4.

[img]
Preview
Published Version
PDF
469Kb

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Regulated expression of suicide genes is a powerful tool to eliminate specific subsets of cells and will find widespread usage in both basic and applied science. A promising example is the specific elimination of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infected cells by LTR-driven suicide genes. The success of this approach, however, depends on a fast and effective suicide gene, which is expressed exclusively in HIV-1 infected cells. These preconditions have not yet been completely fulfilled and, thus, success of suicide approaches has been limited so far. We tested truncated Bid (tBid), a human pro-apoptotic protein that induces apoptosis very rapidly and efficiently, as suicide gene for gene therapy against HIV-1 infection.
RESULTS:

When tBid was introduced into the HIV-1 LTR-based, Tat- and Rev-dependent transgene expression vector pLRed(INS)2R, very efficient induction of apoptosis was observed within 24 hours, but only in the presence of both HIV-1 regulatory proteins Tat and Rev. Induction of apoptosis was not observed in their absence. Cells containing this vector rapidly died when transfected with plasmids containing full-length viral genomic DNA, completely eliminating the chance for HIV-1 replication. Viral replication was also strongly reduced when cells were infected with HIV-1 particles.
CONCLUSIONS:

This suicide vector has the potential to establish a safe and effective gene therapy approach to exclusively eliminate HIV-1 infected cells before infectious virus particles are released.

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Infectious Diseases
DDC:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:21 Jan 2012 20:42
Last Modified:16 Dec 2013 15:29
Publisher:BioMed Central
ISSN:1472-6750
Publisher DOI:10.1186/1472-6750-11-4
PubMed ID:21223573
Citations:Web of Science®. Times Cited: 2
Google Scholar™

Users (please log in): suggest update or correction for this item

Repository Staff Only: item control page