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Immunogenicity of a half-dose of adjuvanted 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine in adults: a prospective cohort study


Coleman, B L; Kuster, S P; Gubbay, J; Scheifele, D; Li, Y; Low, D; Crowcroft, N; Mazzulli, T; Shi, L; Halperin, S A; Law, B; McGeer, A (2012). Immunogenicity of a half-dose of adjuvanted 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine in adults: a prospective cohort study. European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, 31(4):591-597.

Abstract

We aimed to assess the immunogenicity of a single half-dose of AS03-adjuvanted monovalent 2009 pandemic H1N1 vaccine in healthy adults. Healthy subjects age 20-60 years were prospectively enrolled in a cohort receiving intramuscular administration of a single half-dose (1.875 μg of hemagglutinin [HA]) of adjuvanted 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine. Data from participants enrolled in a concomitant study of immunogenicity following a full-dose (3.75 μg of HA) are presented concurrently. Sera for assessment of hemagglutination-inhibiting (HAI) antibody to the vaccine strain were obtained before and 14 or 21 days after vaccination. Ninety-seven participants received a half-dose and 50 received a full-dose of vaccine. In the half-dose cohort, Food and Drug Administration criteria for immunogenicity regarding seroprotection and seroconversion rates were met for subjects aged 20-45 years, but not for those aged 46-60 years. There was no statistically significant difference in the proportion of individuals achieving a post-vaccination HAI titre of ≥1:40, the geometric mean titres of post-vaccination antibody, or the proportion of individuals with a four-fold or greater increase in antibody levels between the two cohorts. Participants 46-60 years of age were significantly less likely to be seroprotected at day 21 than those 20-45 years old in both cohorts. Immunogenicity of a half dose of adjuvanted pH1N1 influenza vaccine was adequate in subjects aged 20-45 years. Dose reduction is a possible strategy for expanding the availability in the event of vaccine shortage in this age group.

We aimed to assess the immunogenicity of a single half-dose of AS03-adjuvanted monovalent 2009 pandemic H1N1 vaccine in healthy adults. Healthy subjects age 20-60 years were prospectively enrolled in a cohort receiving intramuscular administration of a single half-dose (1.875 μg of hemagglutinin [HA]) of adjuvanted 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine. Data from participants enrolled in a concomitant study of immunogenicity following a full-dose (3.75 μg of HA) are presented concurrently. Sera for assessment of hemagglutination-inhibiting (HAI) antibody to the vaccine strain were obtained before and 14 or 21 days after vaccination. Ninety-seven participants received a half-dose and 50 received a full-dose of vaccine. In the half-dose cohort, Food and Drug Administration criteria for immunogenicity regarding seroprotection and seroconversion rates were met for subjects aged 20-45 years, but not for those aged 46-60 years. There was no statistically significant difference in the proportion of individuals achieving a post-vaccination HAI titre of ≥1:40, the geometric mean titres of post-vaccination antibody, or the proportion of individuals with a four-fold or greater increase in antibody levels between the two cohorts. Participants 46-60 years of age were significantly less likely to be seroprotected at day 21 than those 20-45 years old in both cohorts. Immunogenicity of a half dose of adjuvanted pH1N1 influenza vaccine was adequate in subjects aged 20-45 years. Dose reduction is a possible strategy for expanding the availability in the event of vaccine shortage in this age group.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Infectious Diseases
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:22 Jan 2012 16:34
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:24
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0934-9723
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s10096-011-1352-5
PubMed ID:21796343

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