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Impaired neuromotor outcome in school-age children with congenital hypothyroidism receiving early high-dose substitution treatment


Hauri-Hohl, A; Dusoczky, N; Dimitropoulos, A; Leuchter, R H V; Molinari, L; Caflisch, J; Jenni, O G; Latal, B (2011). Impaired neuromotor outcome in school-age children with congenital hypothyroidism receiving early high-dose substitution treatment. Pediatric Research, 70(6):614-618.

Abstract

Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) can lead to intellectual deficits despite early high-dose treatment. Our study aimed to determine whether motor impairments can occur despite early high-dose treatment. Sixty-three children with CH and early (median age of onset of treatment 9 d), high-dose treatment (median starting dose of levothyroxine 14.7 μg/kg/d) were tested with the Zurich Neuromotor Assessment (ZNA) at a median age of 13.8 y (range 7.0-14.2 y). Median z-scores in the children with CH were -0.95 in the pure and -0.56 in the adaptive fine motor component, significantly lower than in the ZNA test norms (p < 0.001 and p = 0.01, respectively). The 26 children with athyreosis were more affected than the 33 children with dysgenesis, particularly in the pure motor (-1.55 versus -0.76, p = 0.03), adaptive fine motor (-1.31 versus 0.13, p < 0.01), and static balance task (-0.47 versus 0.67, p = 0.01). Boys performed worse than girls. Older age at onset of treatment was related to poorer adaptive fine motor performance. Movement quality (assessed by associated movements) was not affected. We conclude that severe CH can cause neuromotor deficits persisting into adolescence. These deficits cannot completely be reversed by postnatal treatment, but earlier age at treatment may reduce the degree of impairment.

Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) can lead to intellectual deficits despite early high-dose treatment. Our study aimed to determine whether motor impairments can occur despite early high-dose treatment. Sixty-three children with CH and early (median age of onset of treatment 9 d), high-dose treatment (median starting dose of levothyroxine 14.7 μg/kg/d) were tested with the Zurich Neuromotor Assessment (ZNA) at a median age of 13.8 y (range 7.0-14.2 y). Median z-scores in the children with CH were -0.95 in the pure and -0.56 in the adaptive fine motor component, significantly lower than in the ZNA test norms (p < 0.001 and p = 0.01, respectively). The 26 children with athyreosis were more affected than the 33 children with dysgenesis, particularly in the pure motor (-1.55 versus -0.76, p = 0.03), adaptive fine motor (-1.31 versus 0.13, p < 0.01), and static balance task (-0.47 versus 0.67, p = 0.01). Boys performed worse than girls. Older age at onset of treatment was related to poorer adaptive fine motor performance. Movement quality (assessed by associated movements) was not affected. We conclude that severe CH can cause neuromotor deficits persisting into adolescence. These deficits cannot completely be reversed by postnatal treatment, but earlier age at treatment may reduce the degree of impairment.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:24 Jan 2012 14:01
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:25
Publisher:Lippincott Wiliams & Wilkins
ISSN:0031-3998
Publisher DOI:10.1203/PDR.0b013e3182321128
Related URLs:http://www.zora.uzh.ch/73954/
PubMed ID:21857388

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