UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

PerOpteryx: automated application of tactics in multi-objective software architecture optimization


Koziolek, Anne; Koziolek, Heiko; Reussner, Ralf (2011). PerOpteryx: automated application of tactics in multi-objective software architecture optimization. In: ACM SIGSOFT conference -- QoSA and ACM SIGSOFT symposium -- ISARCS on Quality of software architectures -- QoSA and architecting critical systems -- ISARCS, Boulder, Colorado, USA, 20 June 2011 - 24 June 2011, 33-42.

Abstract

Designing software architectures that exhibit a good trade-off between multiple quality attributes is hard. Even with a given functional design, many degrees of freedom in the software architecture (e.g. component deployment or server configuration) span a large design space. In current practice, software architects try to find good solutions manually, which is time-consuming, can be error-prone and can lead to suboptimal designs.We propose an automated approach guided by architectural tactics to search the design space for good solutions. Our approach applies multi-objective evolutionary optimization to software architectures modelled with the Palladio Component Model. Software architects can then make well-informed trade-off decisions and choose the best architecture for their situation.To validate our approach, we applied it to the architecture models of two systems, a business reporting system and an industrial control system from ABB. The approach was able to find meaningful trade-offs leading to significant performance improvements or costs savings. The novel use of tactics decreased the time needed to find good solutions by up to 80\%.

Designing software architectures that exhibit a good trade-off between multiple quality attributes is hard. Even with a given functional design, many degrees of freedom in the software architecture (e.g. component deployment or server configuration) span a large design space. In current practice, software architects try to find good solutions manually, which is time-consuming, can be error-prone and can lead to suboptimal designs.We propose an automated approach guided by architectural tactics to search the design space for good solutions. Our approach applies multi-objective evolutionary optimization to software architectures modelled with the Palladio Component Model. Software architects can then make well-informed trade-off decisions and choose the best architecture for their situation.To validate our approach, we applied it to the architecture models of two systems, a business reporting system and an industrial control system from ABB. The approach was able to find meaningful trade-offs leading to significant performance improvements or costs savings. The novel use of tactics decreased the time needed to find good solutions by up to 80\%.

Citations

Altmetrics

Downloads

0 downloads since deposited on 13 Feb 2012
0 downloads since 12 months

Additional indexing

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper), refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Informatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:000 Computer science, knowledge & systems
Language:English
Event End Date:24 June 2011
Deposited On:13 Feb 2012 08:40
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:25
Publisher:Association for Computing Machinery
Series Name:Proceedings of the QoSA-ISARCS '11
ISBN:978-1-4503-0724-6
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1145/2000259.2000267
Related URLs:http://comparch2011.archspot.com/
Other Identification Number:merlin-id:3894
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-55875

Download

[img]
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 866kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations