UZH-Logo

Hypothenar-Hammer-Syndrom


Thalhammer, C (2011). Hypothenar-Hammer-Syndrom. Vasomed - Die Fachzeitschrift für Gefässerkrankungen, 4:23-24.

Abstract

Das Hypothenar-Hammer-Syndrom (HHS) ist ein extrem seltenes Krankheitsbild; in der Literatur findet man Einzelfallberichte und kleine retrospektive Untersuchungen mit maximal 28 Patienten. Das HHS zeichnet sich durch eine einseitige Fingerischämie bei Digitalarterienverschlüssen durch Embolisation aus der Arteria ulnaris aus. Ursächlich sind rezidivierende traumatische Schädigungen der Arteria ulnaris insbesondere durch Schläge auf den ulnarseitigen Handballen.

Das Hypothenar-Hammer-Syndrom (HHS) ist ein extrem seltenes Krankheitsbild; in der Literatur findet man Einzelfallberichte und kleine retrospektive Untersuchungen mit maximal 28 Patienten. Das HHS zeichnet sich durch eine einseitige Fingerischämie bei Digitalarterienverschlüssen durch Embolisation aus der Arteria ulnaris aus. Ursächlich sind rezidivierende traumatische Schädigungen der Arteria ulnaris insbesondere durch Schläge auf den ulnarseitigen Handballen.

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 20 Jan 2012
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, not refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Angiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:German
Date:2011
Deposited On:20 Jan 2012 21:01
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:25
Publisher:Viavital-Verlag
ISSN:0942-1181
Related URLs:http://www.viavital.net/zeitschriften/archiv/46/2011/04 (Publisher)
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-55927

Download

[img]
Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 57kB

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations