UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Why does monogamy prevail in the Alpine Water Pipit Anthus spinoletta?


Bollmann, K; Reyer, H U (1998). Why does monogamy prevail in the Alpine Water Pipit Anthus spinoletta? In: Proceedings of the 22nd International Ornithological Congress, Durban, South Africa, 16 August 1998 - 22 August 1998, 2666-2688.

Abstract

A basic assumtion in the study of mating systems is that the amount and disribution of food and sexual partners influence differences in reproductive success. In this study the ecological, demographic and phenotypical determinants of variation in the social and genetic mating patterns and in reproductive success were analized for a population of Water Pipits Anthus spinoletta. The breeding habitat of the species lies in a variable alpine environment. Conditions at the study site varied markedly in time and space. This is due to a patchy vegetation pattern with large differences in food resources, an increasing population size over the study years and differences in nest predation. The operational sex ratio and the age distribution were stable between breeding seasons. Out of 278 social mating patterns studied, most were monogamous (86%), followed by bachelors (9%), polygyny (3%) and polyandry (2%). For paired individuals the fitness differences of the various mating patterns were small. The population showed an age-assorted mating system. Variation in reproductive success was best explained by nest predation and age of males and females. DNA fingerprints of 393 young from 95 nests revealed extrapair parentage in 7.1% of the young from 18.9% of the nests. Since there was no significant relation between territory-specific prey biomass and reproductive success, and the occurrence of nest predation was stochastic and unpredictable, age may be the most reliable criterium for mate choice. Under these circumstances, monogamy can be expected to be the dominant pair bond, especially under conditions where both parents are required to successfully rear the young.

A basic assumtion in the study of mating systems is that the amount and disribution of food and sexual partners influence differences in reproductive success. In this study the ecological, demographic and phenotypical determinants of variation in the social and genetic mating patterns and in reproductive success were analized for a population of Water Pipits Anthus spinoletta. The breeding habitat of the species lies in a variable alpine environment. Conditions at the study site varied markedly in time and space. This is due to a patchy vegetation pattern with large differences in food resources, an increasing population size over the study years and differences in nest predation. The operational sex ratio and the age distribution were stable between breeding seasons. Out of 278 social mating patterns studied, most were monogamous (86%), followed by bachelors (9%), polygyny (3%) and polyandry (2%). For paired individuals the fitness differences of the various mating patterns were small. The population showed an age-assorted mating system. Variation in reproductive success was best explained by nest predation and age of males and females. DNA fingerprints of 393 young from 95 nests revealed extrapair parentage in 7.1% of the young from 18.9% of the nests. Since there was no significant relation between territory-specific prey biomass and reproductive success, and the occurrence of nest predation was stochastic and unpredictable, age may be the most reliable criterium for mate choice. Under these circumstances, monogamy can be expected to be the dominant pair bond, especially under conditions where both parents are required to successfully rear the young.

Downloads

117 downloads since deposited on 11 Feb 2008
33 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper), refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Event End Date:22 August 1998
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:16
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:14
Series Name:Proceedings International Ornithological Congress
Official URL:http://www.nhbs.com/title.php?tefno=89092
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-564

Download

[img]
Preview
Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 406kB

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations