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Higher order reconstruction for MRI in the presence of spatiotemporal field perturbations


Wilm, B J; Barmet, C; Pavan, M; Pruessmann, K P (2011). Higher order reconstruction for MRI in the presence of spatiotemporal field perturbations. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, 65(6):1690-1701.

Abstract

Despite continuous hardware advances, MRI is frequently subject to field perturbations that are of higher than first order in space and thus violate the traditional k-space picture of spatial encoding. Sources of higher order perturbations include eddy currents, concomitant fields, thermal drifts, and imperfections of higher order shim systems. In conventional MRI with Fourier reconstruction, they give rise to geometric distortions, blurring, artifacts, and error in quantitative data. This work describes an alternative approach in which the entire field evolution, including higher order effects, is accounted for by viewing image reconstruction as a generic inverse problem. The relevant field evolutions are measured with a third-order NMR field camera. Algebraic reconstruction is then formulated such as to jointly minimize artifacts and noise in the resulting image. It is solved by an iterative conjugate-gradient algorithm that uses explicit matrix-vector multiplication to accommodate arbitrary net encoding. The feasibility and benefits of this approach are demonstrated by examples of diffusion imaging. In a phantom study, it is shown that higher order reconstruction largely overcomes variable image distortions that diffusion gradients induce in EPI data. In vivo experiments then demonstrate that the resulting geometric consistency permits straightforward tensor analysis without coregistration.

Despite continuous hardware advances, MRI is frequently subject to field perturbations that are of higher than first order in space and thus violate the traditional k-space picture of spatial encoding. Sources of higher order perturbations include eddy currents, concomitant fields, thermal drifts, and imperfections of higher order shim systems. In conventional MRI with Fourier reconstruction, they give rise to geometric distortions, blurring, artifacts, and error in quantitative data. This work describes an alternative approach in which the entire field evolution, including higher order effects, is accounted for by viewing image reconstruction as a generic inverse problem. The relevant field evolutions are measured with a third-order NMR field camera. Algebraic reconstruction is then formulated such as to jointly minimize artifacts and noise in the resulting image. It is solved by an iterative conjugate-gradient algorithm that uses explicit matrix-vector multiplication to accommodate arbitrary net encoding. The feasibility and benefits of this approach are demonstrated by examples of diffusion imaging. In a phantom study, it is shown that higher order reconstruction largely overcomes variable image distortions that diffusion gradients induce in EPI data. In vivo experiments then demonstrate that the resulting geometric consistency permits straightforward tensor analysis without coregistration.

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41 citations in Web of Science®
45 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Engineering
Dewey Decimal Classification:170 Ethics
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:22 Jan 2012 20:12
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:27
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0740-3194
Publisher DOI:10.1002/mrm.22767
PubMed ID:21520269
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-56440

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