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Safety, feasibility, and diagnostic value of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in patients with cardiac pacemakers and implantable cardioverters/defibrillators at 1.5 T


Naehle, C P; Kreuz, J; Strach, K; Schwab, J O; Pingel, S; Luechinger, R; Fimmers, R; Schild, H; Thomas, D (2011). Safety, feasibility, and diagnostic value of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in patients with cardiac pacemakers and implantable cardioverters/defibrillators at 1.5 T. American Heart Journal, 161(6):1096-1105.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Recent studies suggest that magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the brain and spine may safely be performed in patients with pacemakers (PMs) and implantable cardioverter/defibrillators (ICDs), when taking adequate precautions. The aim of this study was to investigate safety, feasibility, and diagnostic value (DV) of MR imaging in cardiac applications (cardiac MR [CMR]) in patients with PMs and ICDs for the first time.
METHODS:

Thirty-two PM/ICD patients with a clinical need for CMR were examined. The specific absorption rate was limited to 1.5 W/kg. Devices were reprogrammed pre-CMR to minimize interference with the electromagnetic fields. Devices were interrogated pre-CMR and post-CMR and after 3 months. Troponin I levels were measured pre-CMR and post-CMR; image quality (IQ) and DV of CMR were assessed.
RESULTS:

All devices could be reprogrammed normally post-CMR. No significant changes of pacing capture threshold, lead impedance, and troponin I were observed. Image quality in patients with right-sided devices (RSD) was better compared with that in patients with left-sided devices (LSD) (P < .05), and less myocardial segments were affected by device-related artefacts (P < .05). Diagnostic value was rated as sufficiently high, allowing for diagnosis, or better in 12 (100%) of 12 patients with RSD, and only in 7 (35%) of 20 patients with LSD.
CONCLUSIONS:

Cardiac MR may be performed safely when limiting specific absorption rate, appropriately monitoring patients, and following device reprogramming. Cardiac MR delivers good IQ and DV in patients with RSD. Cardiac MR in patients with RSD may therefore be performed with an acceptable risk/benefit ratio, whereas the risk/benefit ratio is rather unfavorable in patients with LSD.

Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Recent studies suggest that magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the brain and spine may safely be performed in patients with pacemakers (PMs) and implantable cardioverter/defibrillators (ICDs), when taking adequate precautions. The aim of this study was to investigate safety, feasibility, and diagnostic value (DV) of MR imaging in cardiac applications (cardiac MR [CMR]) in patients with PMs and ICDs for the first time.
METHODS:

Thirty-two PM/ICD patients with a clinical need for CMR were examined. The specific absorption rate was limited to 1.5 W/kg. Devices were reprogrammed pre-CMR to minimize interference with the electromagnetic fields. Devices were interrogated pre-CMR and post-CMR and after 3 months. Troponin I levels were measured pre-CMR and post-CMR; image quality (IQ) and DV of CMR were assessed.
RESULTS:

All devices could be reprogrammed normally post-CMR. No significant changes of pacing capture threshold, lead impedance, and troponin I were observed. Image quality in patients with right-sided devices (RSD) was better compared with that in patients with left-sided devices (LSD) (P < .05), and less myocardial segments were affected by device-related artefacts (P < .05). Diagnostic value was rated as sufficiently high, allowing for diagnosis, or better in 12 (100%) of 12 patients with RSD, and only in 7 (35%) of 20 patients with LSD.
CONCLUSIONS:

Cardiac MR may be performed safely when limiting specific absorption rate, appropriately monitoring patients, and following device reprogramming. Cardiac MR delivers good IQ and DV in patients with RSD. Cardiac MR in patients with RSD may therefore be performed with an acceptable risk/benefit ratio, whereas the risk/benefit ratio is rather unfavorable in patients with LSD.

Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Engineering
Dewey Decimal Classification:170 Ethics
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:22 Jan 2012 19:23
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:27
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0002-8703
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ahj.2011.03.007
PubMed ID:21641356

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