UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Immunology of brain tumors


Roth, P; Eisele, G; Weller, M (2012). Immunology of brain tumors. In: Aminoff, M; Boller, F; Swaab, D. Neuro-Oncology. Amsterdam: Elsevier, 45-51.

Abstract

Despite significant advances in our understanding of the pathobiology of brain tumors and their treatment, novel therapeutic approaches are urgently needed, particularly for malignant gliomas. In this regard, immunotherapy holds promise and has been a field of intensive research in the last two decades. In order to establish successful immunological strategies, a detailed knowledge of the interaction between brain tumors and the immune system is indispensable. The brain has been called an immunoprivileged site because of a variety of mechanisms that impede the emergence of immune responses. On top of that, brain tumors, most importantly malignant gliomas, elicit pronounced defects in host cell-mediated immunity leading to insufficient immune responses. The activating immune cell ligands that are expressed by tumor cells together with potentially immunogenic antigens are overridden by immune-inhibitory signals with transforming growth factor (TGF)-β as the most prominent immunosuppressive molecule. During the past decade numerous additional molecules and mechanisms have been identified as potential mediators of brain cancer-associated immunosuppression. In contrast, the role of tumor-associated microglia and its antigen-presenting capacity has been clarified only partially, and remains controversial. Only a thorough understanding of these immunological aspects will allow for successful exploitation of the powerful mechanisms of the immune system against brain tumors.

Despite significant advances in our understanding of the pathobiology of brain tumors and their treatment, novel therapeutic approaches are urgently needed, particularly for malignant gliomas. In this regard, immunotherapy holds promise and has been a field of intensive research in the last two decades. In order to establish successful immunological strategies, a detailed knowledge of the interaction between brain tumors and the immune system is indispensable. The brain has been called an immunoprivileged site because of a variety of mechanisms that impede the emergence of immune responses. On top of that, brain tumors, most importantly malignant gliomas, elicit pronounced defects in host cell-mediated immunity leading to insufficient immune responses. The activating immune cell ligands that are expressed by tumor cells together with potentially immunogenic antigens are overridden by immune-inhibitory signals with transforming growth factor (TGF)-β as the most prominent immunosuppressive molecule. During the past decade numerous additional molecules and mechanisms have been identified as potential mediators of brain cancer-associated immunosuppression. In contrast, the role of tumor-associated microglia and its antigen-presenting capacity has been clarified only partially, and remains controversial. Only a thorough understanding of these immunological aspects will allow for successful exploitation of the powerful mechanisms of the immune system against brain tumors.

Citations

7 citations in Web of Science®
8 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:30 Jan 2012 08:06
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:28
Publisher:Elsevier
Series Name:Handbook of Clinical Neurology
Number:104
ISSN:0072-9752
ISBN:978-0-444-52138-5
Publisher DOI:10.1016/B978-0-444-52138-5.00004-9
PubMed ID:22230434

Download

Full text not available from this repository.View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations