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How useful is routine amniotic fluid and neonatal surface swab microbiology at Caesarean section?


Zbinden, A; Zbinden, R; Natalucci, G; Zimmermann, R; Bucher, H U; Krafft, A (2011). How useful is routine amniotic fluid and neonatal surface swab microbiology at Caesarean section? Zeitschrift für Geburtshilfe und Neonatologie, 215(5):205-208.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Our aim was to evaluate the clinical impact of routine amniotic fluid and neonatal surface swab microbiology at Caesarean section.
MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Microbiology data from 1 537 neonates delivered by Caesarean section were analysed in the light of clinical outcome.
RESULTS:

1 340 (87%) neonates had non-pathogenic bacteria or negative culture results from both amniotic fluid and surface swab samples. Of the 197 (13%) neonates with pathogenic bacteria, 22 (1.4%) were diagnosed with infection, but only in 6 (0.4%) were the bacteria presumed to be responsible for the infection. Amniotic fluid and surface swab culture had sensitivities of 54% and 35%, and positive predictive values of 14% and 17%, respectively, for detecting a neonate at risk of infection.
CONCLUSION:

Amniotic fluid and neonatal surface swab microbiology at Caesarean section contributes little if anything to postnatal management and can be safely dropped from operative routine.

BACKGROUND:

Our aim was to evaluate the clinical impact of routine amniotic fluid and neonatal surface swab microbiology at Caesarean section.
MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Microbiology data from 1 537 neonates delivered by Caesarean section were analysed in the light of clinical outcome.
RESULTS:

1 340 (87%) neonates had non-pathogenic bacteria or negative culture results from both amniotic fluid and surface swab samples. Of the 197 (13%) neonates with pathogenic bacteria, 22 (1.4%) were diagnosed with infection, but only in 6 (0.4%) were the bacteria presumed to be responsible for the infection. Amniotic fluid and surface swab culture had sensitivities of 54% and 35%, and positive predictive values of 14% and 17%, respectively, for detecting a neonate at risk of infection.
CONCLUSION:

Amniotic fluid and neonatal surface swab microbiology at Caesarean section contributes little if anything to postnatal management and can be safely dropped from operative routine.

Citations

1 citation in Web of Science®
1 citation in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Other titles:Wie nützlich ist die anlässlich einer Sectio caesarea routinemässig gewonnene Kultur aus Fruchtwasser und Kindsabstrich?
Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Obstetrics
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neonatology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Medical Microbiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:23 Jan 2012 15:47
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:28
Publisher:Thieme
ISSN:0948-2393
Additional Information:Copyright: Georg Thieme Verlag
Publisher DOI:10.1055/s-0031-1291211
PubMed ID:22028061
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-56750

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