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Novel signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) mutations, reduced T(H)17 cell numbers, and variably defective STAT3 phosphorylation in hyper-IgE syndrome


Renner, E D; Rylaarsdam, S; Anover-Sombke, S; Rack, A L; Reichenbach, J; Carey, J C; Zhu, Q; Jansson, A F; Barboza, J; Schimke, L F; Leppert, M F; Getz, M M; Seger, R A; Hill, H R; Belohradsky, B H; Torgerson, T R; Ochs, H D (2008). Novel signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) mutations, reduced T(H)17 cell numbers, and variably defective STAT3 phosphorylation in hyper-IgE syndrome. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 122(1):181-187.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Hyper-IgE syndrome (HIES) is a rare, autosomal-dominant immunodeficiency characterized by eczema, Staphylococcus aureus skin abscesses, pneumonia with pneumatocele formation, Candida infections, and skeletal/connective tissue abnormalities. Recently it was shown that heterozygous signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) mutations cause autosomal-dominant HIES. OBJECTIVE: To determine the spectrum and functional consequences of heterozygous STAT3 mutations in a cohort of patients with HIES. METHODS: We sequenced the STAT3 gene in 38 patients with HIES (National Institutes of Health score >40 points) from 35 families, quantified T(H)17 cells in peripheral blood, and evaluated tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT3. RESULTS: Most STAT3 mutations in our cohort were in the DNA-binding domain (DBD; 22/35 families) or Src homology 2 (SH2) domain (10/35) and were missense mutations. We identified 2 intronic mutations resulting in exon skipping and in-frame deletions within the DBD. In addition, we identified 2 mutations located in the transactivation domain downstream of the SH2 domain: a 10-amino acid deletion and an amino acid substitution. In 1 patient, we were unable to identify a STAT3 mutation. T(H)17 cells were absent or low in the peripheral blood of all patients who were evaluated (n = 17). IL-6-induced STAT3-phosphorylation was consistently reduced in patients with SH2 domain mutations but comparable to normal controls in patients with mutations in the DBD. CONCLUSION: Heterozygous STAT3 mutations were identified in 34 of 35 unrelated HIES families. Patients had impaired T(H)17 cell development, and those with SH2 domain mutations had reduced STAT3 phosphorylation.

BACKGROUND: Hyper-IgE syndrome (HIES) is a rare, autosomal-dominant immunodeficiency characterized by eczema, Staphylococcus aureus skin abscesses, pneumonia with pneumatocele formation, Candida infections, and skeletal/connective tissue abnormalities. Recently it was shown that heterozygous signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) mutations cause autosomal-dominant HIES. OBJECTIVE: To determine the spectrum and functional consequences of heterozygous STAT3 mutations in a cohort of patients with HIES. METHODS: We sequenced the STAT3 gene in 38 patients with HIES (National Institutes of Health score >40 points) from 35 families, quantified T(H)17 cells in peripheral blood, and evaluated tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT3. RESULTS: Most STAT3 mutations in our cohort were in the DNA-binding domain (DBD; 22/35 families) or Src homology 2 (SH2) domain (10/35) and were missense mutations. We identified 2 intronic mutations resulting in exon skipping and in-frame deletions within the DBD. In addition, we identified 2 mutations located in the transactivation domain downstream of the SH2 domain: a 10-amino acid deletion and an amino acid substitution. In 1 patient, we were unable to identify a STAT3 mutation. T(H)17 cells were absent or low in the peripheral blood of all patients who were evaluated (n = 17). IL-6-induced STAT3-phosphorylation was consistently reduced in patients with SH2 domain mutations but comparable to normal controls in patients with mutations in the DBD. CONCLUSION: Heterozygous STAT3 mutations were identified in 34 of 35 unrelated HIES families. Patients had impaired T(H)17 cell development, and those with SH2 domain mutations had reduced STAT3 phosphorylation.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:05 Feb 2009 15:16
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:34
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0091-6749
Publisher DOI:10.1016/j.jaci.2008.04.037
PubMed ID:18602572
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-5693

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