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Mitochondrial matrix calcium is an activating signal for hormone secretion


Wiederkehr, A; Szanda, G; Akhmedov, D; Mataki, C; Heizmann, C W; Schoonjans, K; Pozzan, T; Spät, A; Wollheim, C B (2011). Mitochondrial matrix calcium is an activating signal for hormone secretion. Cell Metabolism, 13(5):601-611.

Abstract

Mitochondrial Ca(2+) signals have been proposed to accelerate oxidative metabolism and ATP production to match Ca(2+)-activated energy-consuming processes. Efforts to understand the signaling role of mitochondrial Ca(2+) have been hampered by the inability to manipulate matrix Ca(2+) without directly altering cytosolic Ca(2+). We were able to selectively buffer mitochondrial Ca(2+) rises by targeting the Ca(2+)-binding protein S100G to the matrix. We find that matrix Ca(2+) controls signal-dependent NAD(P)H formation, respiration, and ATP changes in intact cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that matrix Ca(2+) increases are necessary for the amplification of sustained glucose-dependent insulin secretion in β cells. Through the regulation of NAD(P)H in adrenal glomerulosa cells, matrix Ca(2+) also acts as a positive signal in reductive biosynthesis, which stimulates aldosterone secretion. Our dissection of cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca(2+) signals reveals the physiological importance of matrix Ca(2+) in energy metabolism required for signal-dependent hormone secretion.

Mitochondrial Ca(2+) signals have been proposed to accelerate oxidative metabolism and ATP production to match Ca(2+)-activated energy-consuming processes. Efforts to understand the signaling role of mitochondrial Ca(2+) have been hampered by the inability to manipulate matrix Ca(2+) without directly altering cytosolic Ca(2+). We were able to selectively buffer mitochondrial Ca(2+) rises by targeting the Ca(2+)-binding protein S100G to the matrix. We find that matrix Ca(2+) controls signal-dependent NAD(P)H formation, respiration, and ATP changes in intact cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that matrix Ca(2+) increases are necessary for the amplification of sustained glucose-dependent insulin secretion in β cells. Through the regulation of NAD(P)H in adrenal glomerulosa cells, matrix Ca(2+) also acts as a positive signal in reductive biosynthesis, which stimulates aldosterone secretion. Our dissection of cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca(2+) signals reveals the physiological importance of matrix Ca(2+) in energy metabolism required for signal-dependent hormone secretion.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:May 2011
Deposited On:29 Jan 2012 16:31
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:29
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1550-4131
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cmet.2011.03.015
PubMed ID:21531342
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-57087

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