UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

The effectiveness of internet chat groups in relapse prevention after inpatient psychotherapy


Bauer, S; Wolf, M; Haug, Severin; Kordy, H (2011). The effectiveness of internet chat groups in relapse prevention after inpatient psychotherapy. Psychotherapy Research, 21(2):219-226.

Abstract

The majority of patients benefit from psychotherapeutic treatment. However, many fail to maintain their treatment gains following discharge. In a controlled study, we investigated the effectiveness of internet chat groups in preventing relapse following inpatient treatment. One hundred and fifty-two patients were assessed with the Longitudinal Follow-up Evaluation (LIFE) 1 year after discharge from the hospital. Kaplan Meier survival analyses showed that significantly fewer chat participants (22.2%) than control participants (46.5%) experienced a relapse. Additional analyses yielded a significant difference in the relapse rates of chat and control participants depending on their utilization of outpatient treatment after discharge. The results confirm that technology-enhanced interventions are effective in maintaining treatment gains. Implications of the findings for health care provision are discussed.

The majority of patients benefit from psychotherapeutic treatment. However, many fail to maintain their treatment gains following discharge. In a controlled study, we investigated the effectiveness of internet chat groups in preventing relapse following inpatient treatment. One hundred and fifty-two patients were assessed with the Longitudinal Follow-up Evaluation (LIFE) 1 year after discharge from the hospital. Kaplan Meier survival analyses showed that significantly fewer chat participants (22.2%) than control participants (46.5%) experienced a relapse. Additional analyses yielded a significant difference in the relapse rates of chat and control participants depending on their utilization of outpatient treatment after discharge. The results confirm that technology-enhanced interventions are effective in maintaining treatment gains. Implications of the findings for health care provision are discussed.

Citations

26 citations in Web of Science®
29 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 01 Mar 2012
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Swiss Research Institute for Public Health and Addiction
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:01 Mar 2012 09:29
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 15:30
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:1050-3307
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1080/10503307.2010.547530
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-57383

Download

[img]
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 125kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations